CHIL­DREN TO READ MORE (WITH­OUT NAG­GING THEM)

The Daily Telegraph - Saturday - - FAMILY LIFE -

DON’T RUSH

Just be­cause chil­dren are able to sound out words, it doesn’t mean they can un­der­stand the mean­ing of the whole sen­tence. If chil­dren don’t re­ally get what’s hap­pen­ing in a book, they can get bored and be turned off read­ing at an early age. Re­sist the temp­ta­tion to get caught up in the class read­ing race over who’s on the most ad­vanced Biff and Chip book.

READ WITH THEM

Once chil­dren are able to read fairly flu­ently, around the age of seven, it’s easy to as­sume you can leave it to them. But ac­cord­ing to the Kids and Fam­ily Read­ing Re­port, which sur­veyed more than 1,000 par­ents and their chil­dren, only 37 per cent of par­ents of chil­dren aged six to eight still read them bed­time sto­ries. This is de­spite chil­dren miss­ing this “spe­cial” time of the day with par­ents – and still reap­ing huge ben­e­fits in un­der­stand­ing, vo­cab­u­lary and en­gage­ment. A nightly read­ing ses­sion also helps set up read­ing in their minds as reg­u­lar and re­lax­ing habit.

LET THEM CHOOSE

While it’s tempt­ing to en­cour­age your chil­dren to read the clas­sics you loved as a child, or pass along books from older sib­lings, let your child fol­low their own in­ter­ests, and get ex­cited about a new book, whether it’s from the li­brary or a book­shop. If they love it, let them re-read the same book many times so they re­in­force their un­der­stand­ing of vo­cab­u­lary and sen­tence struc­ture.

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