WHAT SHOULD MY FREE­LANCE JOB LOOK LIKE?

How many days a week are you work­ing? What are you do­ing? How much are you earn­ing? Are you alone, or sur­rounded by peo­ple – a team, per­haps? Where are you work­ing from: your kitchen, a shared workspace, a snazzy of­fice? How much hol­i­day will you take? Wh

The Daily Telegraph - Saturday - - FAMILY LIFE -

Ask your­self the ques­tions be­low and then write a list, draw a pic­ture, cut pho­tos out of mag­a­zines and cre­ate a col­lage or write a story – what­ever feels most nat­u­ral to you. Com­mit­ting your in­ten­tions to pa­per makes them much more likely to come to fruition. It’s about hav­ing a clear fo­cus and know­ing what you’re work­ing to­wards. con­tent, work­ing with a graphic designer and a tech guy on the web­site and set­ting up var­i­ous so­cial me­dia chan­nels, I launched The Early Hour. As planned, I pub­lished an ar­ti­cle a day, first thing in the morn­ing. In the first month, I had more than 10,000 views. I started to build an on­line com­mu­nity of par­ents who were keen to read these ar­ti­cles that fo­cused on the grit­tier side of fam­ily life; the chal­lenges, the bits we’re usu­ally guarded about. In time, I was able to mon­e­tise the plat­form through spon­sored con­tent and brand col­lab­o­ra­tions. It also led to writ­ing free­lance ar­ti­cles for na­tional news­pa­pers and women’s mag­a­zines.

For The Early Hour to suc­ceed, I had to learn lots of new skills. I could al­ready write and edit, but there was the brand­ing side of it, and the chal­lenge of get­ting peo­ple to my web­site. I learned about SEO (search en­gine op­ti­mi­sa­tion, put sim­ply: get­ting your web­site higher up in Google searches), how to use so­cial me­dia to gen­er­ate traf­fic and how to do my own PR.

A men­tor ex­plained that I needed to find my PR “story” so I did, and then se­cured cov­er­age in all the ma­jor na­tion­als and on a load of blogs. At the time, I didn’t have child­care, so I’d work when my daugh­ter napped, or in the evenings. I also popped her in front

MOTHER OF IN­NO­VA­TION An­nie Rid­out with her chil­dren, four-year-old Joni, and Bodhi, who is al­most two. Rid­out at work, right

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