The Press and Journal (Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire)

Declining capercaill­ie needs human help to survive

- BY RITA CAMPBELL

R e s e a r c h e r s c l a i m capercaill­ie numbers will keep falling unless the birds are given help to breed.

N e w l y p u b l i s h e d findings into the breeding and dispersal of the species was undertaken over four years at Strathspey.

A study concluded that, without interventi­on to improve breeding success, it is likely numbers of the already threatened species will plummet.

The Scottish capercaill­ie has been declining in range and population since the 1970s, and now there may be fewer than 1,000 birds left – chiefly in Strathspey.

The Scottish Wildlife Trust has attributed the decline to the birds flying into deer fencing and chick mortality due to wet and cool weather. This latest study, with radio-tagging of six females, allowed 12 possible breeding attempts to be followed. Nine clutches were laid of which six then hatched, with three probably eaten by pine martens. Only two chicks were ultimately born.

Team researcher Kathy Fletcher said: “This study highlights just how low capercaill­ie breeding success is now in the heart of its range. If we wish to have any chance of stabilisin­g numbers, it will require further studies that focus on why chick survival is so low, with subsequent landscape management interventi­ons.”

Though predominan­tly found in the Highlands, capercaill­ie are also found in Aberdeensh­ire. Parts of the Glen Tanar Nature Reserve, near Aboyne, were closed off last year when a male capercaill­ie was “displaying” and “holding its ground” on some of the trails to entice females.

 ??  ?? A female capercaill­ie captured on camera returning to its nest in Strathspey where breeding success is low
A female capercaill­ie captured on camera returning to its nest in Strathspey where breeding success is low

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