The Press and Journal (Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire)

Lifesaver ready for take-off

Community: Charity hails amazing efforts to prepare Scotland’s second air ambulance

- BY ALASTAIR GOSSIP

The north-east’s new helimed will take up service at the end of this week, despite nationwide disruption. Coronaviru­s might have caused Scotland’s Charity Air Ambulance (SCAA) to cancel a grand launch event, media access and a planned tour taking the aircraft around the region – but the crew will begin its lifesaving work on Friday.

Like many workplaces across the country, the charity’s non-essential staff are working from home but its new base in Dyce has remained a hive of activity.

Helimed 79, newly refurbishe­d and upgraded, arrived at Aberdeen Airport last week and builders transformi­ng Babcock’s hangar in Farburn Terrace into a purpose-designed air ambulance base are expected to complete their work by this evening.

Teams, while working in isolation or at recommende­d distances, have been in at weekends as efforts were ramped up to get the job finished ahead of take-off.

SCAA chief executive David Craig

SCAA chief executive David Craig said: “We are always immensely proud of the crew but, even in these difficult circumstan­ces, they have also been working behind the scenes helping to put it all together.

“While we might look at the bigger jobs of getting the helicopter and base ready, they have been getting equipment and essentials together.

“They were in over the weekend to get things sorted and indeed two of them were completing their final signoff for part of their training.

“Everyone has worked tirelessly to get this done and it’s a lot of things people won’t see.

“Even in these difficult circumstan­ces, we still continue to help people all over Scotland.

“It’s hugely exciting to be launching this week and we look forward to increasing air ambulance capacity and resilience.”

The Aberdeen-based EC135 T2E copter will be the charity’s second aircraft, with the first having flown from Perth Airport since 2013.

Although tasked to jobs all across Scotland by the ambulance service, it is hoped the north-east’s most seriously ill and injured patients will benefit hugely from the new aircraft as it will dramatical­ly increase the reach of Aberdeen’s major trauma centre.

Mr Craig said: “We are deployed by the ambulance control room and, as of now, tasking and deployment has not changed.

“Obviously crew are putting themselves at the frontline as, quite frankly, they will not know if someone is transmitti­ng coronaviru­s. They are kitted out with protective equipment required. As for the transferri­ng of coronaviru­s-positive patients, that’s something we leave firmly with the ambulance service.

“We are ready to help and assist where we possibly can.”

Mr Craig also vowed that plans to let north-east communitie­s get up close to the aircraft would not “go to waste” as an open day will be held once the Covid-19 pandemic is overcome.

 ??  ?? AT YOUR SERVICE: The SCAA’s second helimed is ready to help patients across the north-east and further afield, and will dramatical­ly increase the reach of Aberdeen’s new major trauma centre
AT YOUR SERVICE: The SCAA’s second helimed is ready to help patients across the north-east and further afield, and will dramatical­ly increase the reach of Aberdeen’s new major trauma centre
 ??  ?? Scotland’s Charity Air Ambulance has made a huge impact since 2013, saving lives and preventing suffering.
That is why The P&J campaigned successful­ly for SCAA’s second helicopter to be based in our region.
The countdown is now on for the aircraft – call sign Helimed 79 – to start flying missions from Aberdeen Airport.
But this is an emergency service that relies entirely on donations. Each call-out costs about £2,500 and SCAA needs P&J readers to help hit its £6 million target and get things off to a flying start.
So, please do anything you can to raise those funds and show that We’re Backing Helimed 79.
Scotland’s Charity Air Ambulance has made a huge impact since 2013, saving lives and preventing suffering. That is why The P&J campaigned successful­ly for SCAA’s second helicopter to be based in our region. The countdown is now on for the aircraft – call sign Helimed 79 – to start flying missions from Aberdeen Airport. But this is an emergency service that relies entirely on donations. Each call-out costs about £2,500 and SCAA needs P&J readers to help hit its £6 million target and get things off to a flying start. So, please do anything you can to raise those funds and show that We’re Backing Helimed 79.
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