Elec­toral win is not only route to po­lit­i­cal im­pact

THE (Times Higher Education) - - LETTERS -

Your fea­ture “Power drill”

(25 Oc­to­ber) re­ported on US sci­en­tists who have sought to get them­selves and other like-minded schol­ars into elected of­fice.

I am a bio­chemist and was nom­i­nated three times to be the Demo­cratic can­di­date for the US House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives for my district. Each time there was a com­pet­i­tive pri­mary elec­tion, and each time I won hand­ily. My district is over­whelm­ingly Repub­li­can, but I had the ob­jec-

I wanted to bring at­ten­tion to cer­tain is­sues, even though I knew I was un­likely to win the gen­eral elec­tion

tive of bring­ing at­ten­tion to cer­tain is­sues, even though I knew that I was un­likely to win the gen­eral elec­tion. My cam­paign in­cluded vol­un­teers who were par­tic­i­pat­ing in po­lit­i­cal cam­paigns for the first time and who have gone on to their own pro­duc­tive ca­reers in pol­i­tics. I am now an elected city coun­cil­lor.

Win­ning an elec­tion is not the only pos­si­ble po­ten­tial achieve­ment in be­com­ing a can­di­date for of­fice, and sci­en­tists/aca­demics who make the ef­fort should be cel­e­brated and en­cour­aged. mf2018

Via timeshigh­ere­d­u­ca­tion.com

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