ENGLISH BOOKS

This England - - English Books -

1918-2018 — RAF 100 by James Holland (An­drew Deutsch £25) ISBN 9780-2330-05263

This

well-il­lus­trated vol­ume traces the cen­te­nary of the RAF from the tim­ber-framed tor­toises of the First World War to the state of the art air­craft of the 21st cen­tury. (224pp, hard­back)

PLANTS THAT KILL A Nat­u­ral His­tory of the World’s Most Poi­sonous Plants by El­iz­a­beth A. Dauncey and Sonny Lars­son (Kew £25) ISBN 9781-8424-66575

Alarge

num­ber of plants can cause se­ri­ous ill­ness or even death, mainly to an­i­mals but oc­ca­sion­ally to hu­mans as well. This beau­ti­ful book is a botanist’s de­light with su­perb colour pho­tos, il­lus­tra­tions and text. (224pp, hard­back)

THE BEST OF PUNCH CAR­TOONS 2,000 Hu­mour Clas­sics by He­len Walasek

(Carl­ton £35) ISBN 9781-8537-59963

What

a whop­per! Any­one fa­mil­iar with the erst­while mag­a­zine Punch will know ex­actly what to ex­pect from this scin­til­lat­ing col­lec­tion of satir­i­cal car­toons down the years. The wartime hu­mour is par­tic­u­larly in­ter­est­ing. (608pp, hard­back)

SHIPS AND SEAL­ING WAX AND MANY THINGS by Roger Paine (Pen­more Press £11.50) ISBN 9781-9464-09164

The

74 chap­ters in this book re­late to ad­ven­tures at sea, churches, and gen­eral his­tory. All dif­fer­ent, they make an in­ter­est­ing col­lec­tion, ideal for a good bed­time read. (400pp, hard­back)

LADY SUE RYDER OF WAR­SAW by Tessa West (Shep­heard Wal­wyn £19.95) ISBN 9780-8568-35209

Men­tion

Sue Ryder and one im­me­di­ately thinks of char­ity shops and hos­pices but what do we know about the sin­gle-minded phi­lan­thropist be­hind them? This book tells you all you need to know about a great lady with a great vi­sion. It also men­tions her hus­band, the equally en­ter­pris­ing Group Cap­tain Leonard Cheshire. (266pp, pa­per­back)

THE MAK­ING OF THE WIND IN THE WIL­LOWS by Pe­ter Hunt (Bodleian Li­brary £12.99) ISBN 9781-8512-44799

How

did a fa­mous book come to be writ­ten by a man with no in­ter­est in it and how did it be­come a chil­dren’s clas­sic when it was al­most en­tirely in­tended for adults? This splen­did book gives the an­swers to both these cu­ri­ous co­nun­drums. (112pp, pa­per­back)

OUR STREET Grow­ing up in the 1950s by Brian Car­line (Pala­tine £7.99) ISBN 9781-9108-37122 FROST FAIRS TO FUN­FAIRS A His­tory of the English Fair by Al­lan Ford & Nick Cor­ble

(Am­ber­ley £14.99) ISBN 9781-4466-61520

Com­plete

with many colour images this a su­perb ac­count of how sim­ple en­ter­tain­ment has grad­u­ated to mod­ern and ex­cit­ing grav­i­ty­de­fy­ing rides. Of par­tic­u­lar in­ter­est is the his­tory of many other types of fairs down the years, in­clud­ing steam and agri­cul­tural. (96pp, pa­per­back)

THE HIS­TORY OF ENG­LAND’S CATHE­DRALS by Nicholas Orme (Im­press £20) ISBN 9781-9076-05925

An

ex­cel­lent chrono­log­i­cal ac­count of how our cathe­drals de­vel­oped down the cen­turies. Well-il­lus­trated through­out, the text is both in­ter­est­ing and in­for­ma­tive, mak­ing it a real plea­sure to dip into, or read from the be­gin­ning. (304pp, pa­per­back)

The His­tory of Eng­land’s Cathe­drals is avail­able by post from This Eng­land. For fur­ther de­tails see page 88.

THE FOR­GOT­TEN VCS The Far East dur­ing WW2 THE DESERT VCS North Africa dur­ing WW2 by Brian Best (Front­line £19.99) ISBN 9781-5267-17979 & ISBN 9781-5267-21068

Two

more vol­umes from a ded­i­cated au­thor who is to be con­grat­u­lated on his on­go­ing re­search and pub­li­ca­tions re­lat­ing to our high­est mil­i­tary award for gal­lantry. (200pp, hard­back)

CHURCHILL’S THIN GREY LINE Bri­tish Mer­chant Ships at War 1939-1945 by Bernard Ed­wards

(Pen & Sword £19.99) ISBN 9781-5267-11663

Another

bril­liant book by a re­tired sea cap­tain and mas­ter word­smith who recre­ates the past as though we were there among the fran­tic nau­ti­cal ac­tion. No­body does it bet­ter. (236pp, hard­back)

YORK­SHIRE’S SE­CRET CAS­TLES A con­cise guide and com­pan­ion by Paul C. Le­vitt (Pen & Sword £12.99) ISBN 9781-5267-06201

This

guide traces ob­scure earth­works and tim­ber cas­tles erected across our largest county, mainly fol­low­ing the Nor­man Con­quest be­tween 1071 and 1145. The ma­jor­ity are now ru­ined with sev­eral merged into the lo­cal land­scape but it makes a cap­ti­vat­ing quest. (148pp, pa­per­back)

WOMEN’S LON­DON by Rachel Kol­sky (Lifestyle £14.99) ISBN 9781-5048-00822

Subti­tled

“A tour guide to great lives” this is a wellil­lus­trated vol­ume al­though some of the women se­lected might raise a few eyebrows. How­ever, there are enough ex­am­ples to please ev­ery­one. (264pp, pa­per­back)

SHAKE­SPEARE’S LON­DON ON FIVE GROATS A DAY by Richard Tames

AN­CIENT ROME ON FIVE DENARII A DAY by Philip Matyszak (Thames & Hud­son £8.99) ISBN 9780-5002-93867 ISBN 9780-5002-93768

These

in­ge­nious guides bring the past to life, by gen­er­at­ing an image of the so­cial, po­lit­i­cal, ge­o­graph­i­cal and eco­nomic cli­mate of the time. Pre­vi­ous com­pan­ion vol­umes worth look­ing out for in the se­ries in­clude An­cient Athens on Five Drach­mas a Day and Re­nais­sance Florence on Five Florins a Day. Good fun! (160pp, pa­per­back)

TO­TAL ROAD CY­CLING Ride Like a Pro (Uni­corn £16.99) ISBN 9781-7873-90652

As­plen­did

DIY guide to se­ri­ous cy­cling. Beau­ti­fully il­lus­trated in colour with ev­ery pos­si­ble as­pect cov­ered in de­tail, this book will de­light ev­ery­one in­ter­ested in cy­cling, not just road rac­ing. How to choose your bike, where to go for the best pos­si­ble ex­pe­ri­ence, how to fix a punc­ture, even a bro­ken chain, it’s all there. (192pp, pa­per­back)

CROOME A cre­ation of ge­nius by Cather­ine Gor­don

(Scala £20) ISBN 9781-7855-11158

Ca­pa­bil­ity

Brown was greater than his nick­name im­plies be­cause, in ad­di­tion to his many fine land­scaped grounds, he some­how found time to com­pletely re­build a large brick­built Ja­cobean coun­try home at Croome Court in Worces­ter­shire, into what is now a grand neo-pal­la­dian coun­try pile and es­tate. How did he man­age to fit ev­ery­thing in? This book goes a long way to an­swer­ing the ques­tions, not just about Croome but also his many other projects. (208pp, pa­per­back)

THE DUN COW RIB A Very Nat­u­ral Child­hood by John Lis­ter-kaye

(Canon­gate £20) ISBN 9781-7868-01457

The

au­thor found fame as a nat­u­ral­ist af­ter his friend, Gavin Maxwell, per­suaded him to move to Scot­land af­ter he him­self found fame with “Tarka the Ot­ter”. This grip­ping ac­count of the young Lis­ter-kaye’s un­fold­ing aware­ness of the nat­u­ral world is sheer de­light. (356pp, hard­back)

Heart­beat and Be­yond by John Fair­ley and Gra­ham Iron­side is a pot­ted his­tory cov­er­ing 50 years of York­shire Tele­vi­sion, bring­ing back many mem­o­ries for those resident in the White Rose county and also for many more around the coun­try. (Pen & Sword, 188pp, hard­back, £25) ISBN 9781-4738-48269

Do­minic Couzens is an or­nithol­o­gist and in Songs of Love and War, The Dark Heart of Bird Be­hav­iour he gives a de­tailed ac­count of bird sound and how it re­lates to the mys­te­ri­ous world up in the sky. (Blooms­bury, 296pp, hard­back, £16.99) ISBN 9781-4729-09916

Every­body knows some­one suf­fer­ing from men­tal ill­ness which is far more preva­lent than most peo­ple imag­ine and much more dif­fi­cult to di­ag­nose than phys­i­cal ill­ness. Be­ing a church­goer does not au­to­mat­i­cally make one im­mune and Freed From Shame by Dawn Holmes and Karen Todd is a down-to-earth at­tempt to help those who feel trapped. It is not in­tended to be a med­i­cal, sci­en­tific or clin­i­cal book but a pub­li­ca­tion seek­ing to help via a se­ries of per­sonal sto­ries, sup­ported by straight­for­ward and ben­e­fi­cial ex­pla­na­tions about de­pres­sion. (Sim­pli­cate, 126pp, pa­per­back, £8.99) ISBN 9781-7880-81955

Papil­iones is the Latin name for but­ter­flies and this de­light­ful lit­tle book is a col­lec­tion of in­for­ma­tion and po­ems about 34 dif­fer­ent do­mes­tic va­ri­eties. The au­thor, Jonathan Bradley, clev­erly seeks to de­fine the char­ac­ter­is­tics and habi­tat of each, mixed with a hu­mor­ous twin­kle along the way. Any prof­its go to but­ter­fly con­ser­va­tion. (Choir Press 112pp, hard­back, £15.95) ISBN 9781-9115-89211

Lost Lanes West, 36 Glo­ri­ous Bike Rides in the West Coun­try is a ter­rific pub­li­ca­tion and, dare one say, some of the se­lected routes are also suitable for mo­torists. Cov­er­ing Dorset, Wilt­shire, Som­er­set, Devon and Corn­wall the choices in­clude where to stay, eat, en­joy wild swim­ming or sim­ply take in the nat­u­ral beauty of the sur­round­ings. The colour pho­tog­ra­phy is stun­ning and even if you don’t cy­cle or drive, just turn­ing the pages of this book is a real plea­sure. (Wild Things, 256pp, pa­per­back, £16.99) ISBN 9781-9106-36138

Some women be­lieved that mil­i­tant be­hav­iour de­layed women’s suf­frage but you can de­cide the truth for your­self by read­ing Jane Robin­son’s Hearts and Minds, The Un­told Story of the Great Pilgrimage and How Women Won the Vote. (Dou­ble­day, 374pp, hard­back, £20) ISBN 9780-8575-23914

Map­ping Shake­speare by Jeremy Black is a lav­ishly il­lus­trated colour vol­ume but more about Tu­dor maps than about the bard him­self. If you like old maps, how­ever, then you will en­joy this large book be­cause one can spend hours study­ing the de­tail in the many pic­tures. (Con­way, 192pp, hard­back, £25) ISBN 9781-4088-92725

Diesel lo­co­mo­tives have been around for more than 100 years but never pulled ex­press trains on a reg­u­lar ba­sis un­til the mid­dle of the 20th cen­tury. In the rush to pre­serve steam en­gines it is of­ten over­looked that a huge num­ber of diesels were also res­cued to run on her­itage rail­ways. In BR Diesel Lo­co­mo­tives in Preser­va­tion, Fred Kerr has put to­gether a mar­vel­lous col­lec­tion of var­ied colour pho­tos and re­lated text. (Pen & Sword, 126pp, hard­back, £25) ISBN 9781-5267-13087

Any­one in­ter­ested in walk­ing or even moun­tain bik­ing our long dis­tance foot­paths, need look no fur­ther than the Trail­blazer Guides. The lat­est is an up­dated ver­sion of the South Downs Way by Jim Man­thorpe and Daniel Mc­cro­han, which ex­plains how to plan your trip, to­gether with a list of places to eat and stay, backed up with splen­did hand-drawn maps and help­ful in­for­ma­tion about what flora and fauna you can ex­pect to find along the way. Other guides in this mar­vel­lous se­ries in­clude The Ridge­way, North Downs Way, North Devon, South Devon, Dales Way, Cleve­land Way, Thames Path, Cotswold Way, Coast to Coast, Pen­nine Way, and both Corn­wall and Dorset Coast Paths. Pocket-sized, these books are a real treat in them­selves and prob­a­bly the most com­pre­hen­sive ever com­piled about our long dis­tance paths. Why not get up and go, even if you only plan to visit sec­tions of the foot­paths by car? (Trail­blazer, 204pp, pa­per­back, £11.99) ISBN 9781-9058-64935 www.trail­blazer-guides.com

Eng­land’s For­got­ten Past by Richard Tames is a witty and in­ter­est­ing bed­time book, full of un­sung he­roes and hero­ines, fa­mous and not so fa­mous bat­tles and peo­ple, to­gether with all kinds of other in­ter­est­ing facts — for ex­am­ple who was our most pro­lific and pop­u­lar preacher? (Thames & Hud­son, 192pp, pa­per­back, £8.99) ISBN 9781-8468-92417

Eng­land’s For­got­ten Past is avail­able by post from This Eng­land. For fur­ther de­tails see page 88.

Rex Sly is a Fens­man and in Ex­plor­ing the Fen-edge he traces the route of the Ro­man Car Dyke from Peterborough to Lin­coln, vis­it­ing the vil­lages and towns along the way. (Sly, 160pp, pa­per­back, £14.99) ISBN 9781-9098-11416

Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire are a col­lage of colour pic­tures and text by pho­tog­ra­pher Pe­ter Et­teridge, avail­able in Kin­dle. (Et­teridge, 116pp, pa­per­back, £2.99) ASIN B071DSHMZN & ASIN B078BLJMLD

Reimag­in­ing Bri­tain, Foun­da­tions for Hope by Justin Welby is the Arch­bishop of Can­ter­bury’s cam­paign to trans­late Chris­tian the­ory into daily ac­tion. (Blooms­bury, 300pp, hard­back, £16.99) ISBN 9781-4729-46972

For de­tails of books that can be or­dered from us, please see pages 88-89.

One of 2,000 il­lus­trated chuck­les in The Best of Punch Car­toons.

Be­ware eat­ing wild berries which look invit­ing. This one is Woody Night­shade whose poi­sonous fruit ripen from green, via orange, to an at­trac­tive red (see Plants That Kill).

Toad and his chums out­side Toad Hall (see The Mak­ing of The Wind in the Wil­lows).

One of Henry VIII’S six new cathe­drals, the for­mer abbey at Peterborough, which was el­e­vated to­gether with Ch­ester, Glouces­ter, Ox­ford, Bris­tol and West­min­ster (see The His­tory of Eng­land’s Cathe­drals).

A tra­di­tional Chair-o-plane (see Frost Fairs to Fun­fairs).

This is what St. Paul’s Cathe­dral looked like in Shake­speare’s day, the orig­i­nal spire hav­ing been de­stroyed by fire in 1561. In the fore­ground is St. Paul’s Cross, the most pop­u­lar pul­pit of its time (see Shake­speare’s Lon­don on Five Groats a Day).

One of sev­eral amus­ing car­toons il­lus­trat­ing Our Street.

An artist’s im­pres­sion of what Croome Court in Worces­ter­shire looked like be­fore Ca­pa­bil­ity Brown com­pletely trans­formed the orig­i­nal Ja­cobean house and grounds into the neo-pal­la­dian style (see Croome).

If you as­pire to be­com­ing a se­ri­ous ped­aller then Road Cy­cling — Ride Like a Pro is a ter­rific guide which tells you ev­ery­thing you need to know. Not all rides have this idyl­lic scenic back­ground though!

Amaz­ingly, the Painted Lady but­ter­fly (Vanessa car­dui), mi­grates as far north as the Arctic Cir­cle. “Car­dui” means “this­tles” on which the lar­vae feed (see Papil­iones).

Han­nah Hauxwell farmed alone in the High Pen­nines and be­came a re­luc­tant star fol­low­ing a York­shire Tele­vi­sion doc­u­men­tary (see Heart­beat and Be­yond).

Above, nine pre­served Class 14 lo­co­mo­tives pull a 50th an­niver­sary spe­cial on the East Lan­cashire Her­itage Rail­way (a tenth broke down ear­lier in the day) while the pro­to­type Deltic ex­press en­gine on the right was first un­veiled 60 years ago (see BR Diese

If you want to get off the beaten track, on ei­ther two or four wheels, then Dart­moor in Devon might fit the bill, al­ways as­sum­ing it is not shrouded in mist or thick fog (see Lost Lanes West).

Beachy Head in Sus­sex, one of sev­eral pho­tos, il­lus­tra­tions and maps in the South Downs Way.

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