TRAVEL TIPS FOR VIS­IT­ING MAN­I­TOBA, CANADA

Timeless Travels Magazine - - CANADA -

FLY­ING

To reach Egenolf Lake, you must first fly to Win­nipeg airport in Canada. From there, Gan­gler’s SubArc­tic Ad­ven­tures is a fly-in, fly-out op­er­a­tion with its own 1,646-me­tre airstrip. Gan­gler’s North Seal River Lodge is at a lat­i­tude of 58° 58’ 60” and is served by turbo prop planes fly­ing char­ter flights from Win­nipeg via Thomp­son (a two-and-a-half hour jour­ney). Float planes are avail­able for trans­fers to out­ly­ing lodges and sur­round­ing lakes.

Air Canada flies to Win­nipeg, via Toronto Pear­son In­ter­na­tional Airport, from Lon­don Heathrow and flies from var­i­ous ci­ties in the USA to Win­nipeg, many non-stop. WestJet flies to Win­nipeg, via Toronto, from both Lon­don Gatwick and Glas­gow, and has nu­mer­ous flights from dif­fer­ent cap­i­tals in the USA. Delta also has nu­mer­ous direct flights from var­i­ous ci­ties in the USA. Delta, Westjet and Air Canada also have nu­mer­ous non-direct flights from Aus­tralia to Win­nipeg.

GET­TING AROUND

There are no roads around the re­mote North Seal River Lodge. Bi­cy­cles, ca­noes and kayaks are avail­able for use around the prop­erty. Guided walk­ing tours and an es­ker tour in an All-Ter­rain Ve­hi­cle (ATV) are in­cluded in the North Seal Wilder­ness Ad­ven­ture pack­age. So too is a float plane flight over the Robert­son Es­ker

VISAS

Canada op­er­ates an Elec­tronic Travel Au­tho­riza­tion (eTA) scheme and a visa scheme. The eTA is manda­tory for vis­i­tors from the United King­dom who do not need a visa. To find out if you need a visa or an eTA, see

www.canada.ca/eta for in­for­ma­tion about the ap­pli­ca­tion process. The online ap­pli­ca­tion process for an eTA cur­rently costs CAD$7.

THE ES­SEN­TIALS

Time dif­fer­ence: GMT -6 Lan­guage: English

Elec­tri­cal current/ plugs: 220 AC volts. Plugs are rounded two-pronged va­ri­ety.

Wa­ter: Tap wa­ter is safe to drink in Man­i­toba. Bot­tled wa­ter is pro­vided in the cabins at North Seal River Lodge.

i EX­TRA IN­FOR­MA­TION

For in­for­ma­tion about Gan­gler’s Sub-Arc­tic Ad­ven­tures, see the www.

gan­gler­sad­ven­tures.com web­site. The Travel Man­i­toba web­site has ideas about things to do and see in the prov­ince: www.trav­el­man­i­toba.com.

For in­for­ma­tion about places to visit in Win­nipeg, see the Tourism Win­nipeg web­site: www. tourismwin­nipeg.com.

The Des­ti­na­tion Canada web­site is a use­ful source of in­for­ma­tion about things to do and see across Man­i­toba and else­where in the coun­try: www. des­ti­na­tion­canada.com.

Win­nipeg of­fers a range of things to see and do be­fore and af­ter spend­ing time in the north of the prov­ince: The Cana­dian Mu­seum of Hu­man Rights ( www.hu­man­rights.ca) is a strik­ing build­ing de­signed by An­toine Pre­dock and fea­tures the Is­rael Asper Tower of Hope. In­ter­ac­tive ex­hibits within the mu­seum con­vey in­for­ma­tion about hu­man rights is­sues, strug­gles and abuses.

Don’t miss an op­por­tu­nity to join a Her­metic Code Tour of the Man­i­toba State Leg­isla­tive Build­ing

( www.frankalbo.com/tours).

The fas­ci­nat­ing 90-minute tour is based on re­search by Dr Frank Albo, who as­serts that the sym­bol­ism and mea­sure­ments of the build­ing means it was de­signed as a mod­ern ver­sion of the Tem­ple of Solomon.

WEATHER

The weather in north­ern Man­i­toba is change­able and varies markedly ac­cord­ing to the season. The sum­mer months, from June un­til mid-Au­gust, tend to be warm and sunny while the winter is cold, harsh and char­ac­terised by heavy snow­fall.

The av­er­age Jan­uary high tem­per­a­ture is -18°C while the av­er­age July high is 23°C. Even in sum­mer it makes sense to have warm, wa­ter­proof cloth­ing, as the weather can quickly turn cool, windy and wet.

Sum­mer days in north­ern Man­i­toba can be sunny, so it makes sense to take sun cream, a broad-brimmed hat and sun­glasses. Take an in­sect re­pel­lent and long cloth­ing to pre­vent bugs bit­ing while out­doors af­ter sun­down.

MONEY

Cur­rency: The cur­rency in Canada is the Cana­dian dol­lar, where $1 is made up of 100 cents. The one dol­lar coin is nick­named the loonie, af­ter the duck — a loon — which is de­picted on the re­verse. Notes are avail­able in de­nom­i­na­tions of $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100.

ATMs: Cash is ac­ces­si­ble via ATMs, which are widely avail­able in ur­ban ar­eas. (If you want cash for drinks and tips at North Seal River Lodge en­sure you with­draw it be­fore de­part­ing from Win­nipeg.)

Credit cards: Are widely ac­cepted in ho­tels, shops and restau­rants.

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