Na­ture’s Spirit snow­shoe rab­bit foot dub­bing and Hem­ing­way’s hare dub­bing £2.99

Trout Fisherman (UK) - - Gear On Test -

IN my opin­ion you can never have too many nat­u­ral hare’s ear ef­fect dub­bings which are so use­ful on a whole range of dif­fer­ent nymphs, emerg­ers and dry flies. I came across th­ese two prod­ucts on the Funky Fly­ty­ing web­site. The first one is Na­ture’s Spirit snow­shoe rab­bit foot dub­bing which comes in a mind­blow­ing 25 colours in­clud­ing nat­u­ral hare’s ear (pic­tured), cad­dis green and rusty brown. Some of the shades are achieved by blend­ing sev­eral dif­fer­ent colours to­gether which pro­duces re­ally in­ter­est­ing re­sults. The dub­bing is a blend of rab­bit fur and the spikier fur trimmed from the hind feet of a snow­shoe rab­bit. The sta­ple length is rea­son­ably short and it cre­ates quite a soft dub­bing which ropes up re­ally eas­ily around the thread. The long fi­bres from a snow­shoe rab­bit’s foot are quite buoy­ant and are of­ten used as wings on dry flies and emerg­ers. In this blend the fi­bres have been cut and mixed with or­di­nary rab­bit fur so you won’t be able to rely on its buoy­ancy to float your pat­tern. But the dub­bing does take floatant very well. De­spite its name, Hem­ing­way’s hare’s dub­bing (also £2.99) is ac­tu­ally pre-blended rab­bit hair! This dub­bing con­tains much longer guard hair fi­bres than the Na­ture’s Spirit prod­uct, and the ra­tio of guard hairs to un­der­fur is also greater. The re­sult is a lovely spikey, al­most griz­zle look­ing dub­bing that is great for both nymphs and dries. It can be dubbed straight to the thread and ropes up fairly eas­ily, and it also works very well in a split thread or dub­bing loop tech­nique if you want a much spikier fly body. You can also tease the fi­bres out to a much greater de­gree than the snow­shoe rab­bit dub­bing blend. Avail­able in 27 colours, in­clud­ing nat­u­ral (pic­tured), cream, pale yel­low and light or­ange.

Web: www.funkyfly­ty­ing.co.uk Tel: 01823 617373

Snow­shoe rab­bit dub­bing is soft and ropes up well.

The Hare’s Dub­bing is spikey and can eas­ily be teased out.

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