Some like it hot

Tips and tricks for catch­ing fish in a tight spot

Trout & Salmon (UK) - - CONTENTS - PHO­TOG­RA­PHY: LLOYD ROGERS

Tips for catch­ing fish ly­ing un­der trees in hot weather, with Don Staz­icker

THE NEXT TIME some­one sug­gests cut­ting down trees and trim­ming branches to tidy up the river and make cast­ing eas­ier, re­mem­ber that trout live un­der cover for a rea­son. I view trout un­der cover as an op­por­tu­nity, not as a prob­lem. If you can get a fly to these fish, they are the ones that have rarely been caught be­fore, they are more likely to be ris­ing on the bright­est of sunny days and be­cause they feel se­cure they will of­ten take your fly con­fi­dently.

WHY TROUT HOLD UN­DER COVER?

They are pro­tected from preda­tors, in­clud­ing an­glers. The greater the fish­ing pres­sure that a stream re­ceives, the more the trout will be found un­der cover. Tree cover cre­ates ar­eas of slow-mov­ing wa­ter where fish can hold ef­fort­lessly, dart­ing out into the faster cur­rent to take pass­ing food. Trail­ing branches chan­nel and strain food from the sur­face and har­bour food or­gan­isms that fall on to the wa­ter. Also, the fish may find it eas­ier to see prey clearly when it is not be­ing viewed against a bright sky.

WHY DO AN­GLERS NOT LIKE COVER?

It is harder to present a fly well to fish ly­ing un­der cover. We fear los­ing our flies and leader. Where cover over­hangs a bank, the cur­rent is of­ten slower than in the main stream and pre­sent­ing the fly with­out drag over this cur­rent dif­fer­en­tial can be dif­fi­cult. Trail­ing branches that touch the sur­face can also prevent us get­ting a drift.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.