TV & Satellite Week

LOOKING FOR clues

A CROSSWORDS­ETTING SLEUTH AND HER FRIENDS investigat­e a killing spree in a sleepy English town

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The Marlow Murder Club

Wednesday & Thursday, 8pm, Drama (box set, UKTV Play)

AS THE CREATOR of Caribbean-set crime drama Death in Paradise, writer Robert Thorogood has shown that even the most idyllic location can be a hotbed for murder. Now, in Drama’s new series, he’s turning his attention to the dark underbelly of a picturepos­tcard Home Counties town.

Two-parter The Marlow Murder Club is adapted by Thorogood – who lives in Marlow – from his own bestsellin­g series of novels and centres on spirited crossword setter and retired archaeolog­ist Judith Potts (Samantha Bond).

When she goes for her regular swim in the River Thames one evening and hears a gunshot, Judith becomes certain her neighbour, an art-gallery owner, has been murdered.

Local cop DS Tanika

Malik (Natalie Dew) is dubious, but

Judith sets out to investigat­e, and as she gathers evidence, she crosses paths with local dog walker Suzie

Harris (Jo Martin)

NATALIE DEW AS DS TANIKA MALIK and vicar’s wife Becks Starling (Cara Horgan), and the trio team up to crack the case.

‘Because of her background in archaeolog­y, Judith likes to delve, and now she is delving into this mystery. She has a passion for puzzles, and she also enjoys the camaraderi­e and the adventure,’ says Downton Abbey’s Bond, 62.

‘All the women have different background­s and different things that intrigue them. Judith is the eldest and bossiest and the brains behind it. But there’s an element of excitement that the three of them share. They get swept up by what they could achieve.’

RISKY BUSINESS

As the body count rises, Tanika comes to realise that the women’s dogged determinat­ion to uncover the truth could prove vital to the police investigat­ion – but also be rather risky for the women.

‘Tanika, who is very good at her job, keeps trying to explain to them that it’s dangerous and it’s police business,’ shares Bond. ‘But these three amateur sleuths like to think that they’re helping her – and very often they are.’

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