YOUR FREE PASS­PORT FOR TIME TRAVEL

Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine - - ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE -

Ge­neal­o­gist An­drew Chap­man sets you off on a unique jour­ney thanks to your free sub­scrip­tion to TheGe­neal­o­gist (worth £24.95)

Trac­ing your fam­ily his­tory has never been eas­ier. With this mag­a­zine, you have re­ceived an ex­clu­sive in­vi­ta­tion to sign up for a free three-month Gold sub­scrip­tion to TheGe­neal­o­gist, the best site for get­ting started with re­search­ing your fam­ily roots. Your Gold sub­scrip­tion con­tains a wealth of re­sources and tools for push­ing back through the cen­turies of your per­sonal her­itage.

SET­TING OFF ON YOUR VOY­AGE

The golden rule of ge­neal­ogy is to work back­wards. You’ll need a few pieces of in­for­ma­tion – ideally a date and a place for some­one whose roots you’d like to ex­plore. Any fam­ily doc­u­ments you may have found, such as let­ters, pho­to­graphs, wills or news­pa­per cut­tings, will also come in use­ful. You will al­ways need to cor­rob­o­rate what you find with ac­tual records.

BIRTHS MAR­RIAGE SAND DEATHS

Birth, mar­riage and death in­dexes con­tain in­for­ma­tion will al­low you to buy copies of the orig­i­nal cer­tifi­cates from the Gen­eral Reg­is­ter Of­fice. The ac­tual cer­tifi­cates then open up a lot more in­for­ma­tion: date of birth, names and ad­dress of par­ents for a birth; ad­dresses of the spouses and names of fa­thers from mar­riage cer­tifi­cates; and place of death, age and in­for­mant’s de­tails from deaths.

TEN-YEAR LEAPS

The cen­sus records avail­able on­line span ev­ery ten years from 1841 to 1911 in­clu­sive. If you find your an­ces­tor as a child, you’ll then have de­tails of their par­ents and sib­lings. Their ad­dress is use­ful, too, as you may find your fore­bears stayed put from one decade to the next – and in fact TheGe­neal­o­gist’s bril­liant Mas­ter Search fea­ture even al­lows you to search these records by ad­dress and key­words such as oc­cu­pa­tion.

FIND­ING MORE DE­TAIL

Res­i­den­tial and trade di­rec­to­ries, some as early as the 1770s, typ­i­cally tell you about the com­mu­ni­ties where your fam­ily lived. You’ll also find land own­er­ship records from the 1870s cov­er­ing Bri­tain and Ire­land, as well as ex­ten­sive Rolls of Hon­our for WWI, for ex­am­ple, as well as army lists from the late 17th cen­tury up to 1940, and var­i­ous navy lists from 1822 to 1944.

PUSH­ING BACK THROUGH TIME

The 500-year old parish record sys­tem gives you ac­cess to col­lec­tions of tran­scribed bap­tism, mar­riage and burial records for more than 30 English coun­ties and some parts of Wales, as well as a ma­jor col­lec­tion of Non­con­formist reg­is­ters cov­er­ing Methodists, Bap­tists, Catholics, Quak­ers and other de­nom­i­na­tions. You will also have ac­cess to the vast col­lec­tion of wills proved in the Pre­rog­a­tive Court of Can­ter­bury (PCC) – these span from 1384 to 1858 – as well as other col­lec­tions of wills from around 20 coun­ties, dat­ing from the 16th to 18th cen­turies.

MAS­TER THE PAST

It’s par­tic­u­larly easy to make con­nec­tions be­tween dif­fer­ent types of records with your Gold sub­scrip­tion, thanks to TheGe­neal­o­gist’s pow­er­ful and easy-to-use Mas­ter Search fea­ture – just en­ter what­ever in­for­ma­tion you have and it will pro­vide in­stant re­sults which you can then fil­ter. Of­ten, even just a name and a lo­ca­tion can be enough to set you off on your time-trav­el­ling trip. Bon voy­age!

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