SWEET TALK

Su­gar may be the sweet­est nu­tri­tional pariah, but pore over our quiz and you can sate your de­sires with­out get­ting your just desserts

Women's Health (UK) - - CONTENTS -

Think you’ve got su­gar sussed? Come on, then – prove it

Q1 SU­GAR HAS BEEN SHOWN TO _______ YOUR MEM­ORY

An­swer: A and C. Ac­cord­ing to the Univer­sity of Barcelona, com­bin­ing your daily caf­feine hit with su­gar jump-starts your men­tal dex­ter­ity. Best save it for those painfully early morn­ing meet­ings, though: over time, a sug­ary diet hin­ders learn­ing and mem­ory, UCLA re­ports, dam­ag­ing com­mu­ni­ca­tion be­tween brain cells.

Q2 BY HOW MANY YEARS CAN SUG­ARY DRINKS AC­CEL­ER­ATE CELL AGE­ING?

An­swer: B. A sweet tooth can add years as well as pounds. Re­search in the Amer­i­can

Jour­nal Of Pub­lic Health found that peo­ple who have a can of sug­ary drink per day ex­pe­ri­ence DNA changes typ­i­cal of cells 4.6 years older – sim­i­lar changes as those you’d see due to smok­ing.

Q3 EX­CESS SU­GAR CAN MAKE YOUR PMS STRUG­GLES EVEN MORE REAL

An­swer: A. If you won’t cut back on Min­strels for your teeth, do it for your monthly cramps. The Bri­tish Di­etetic As­so­ci­a­tion points to diet as a start­ing point to re­duce PMS symp­toms and sug­gests bas­ing meals and snacks around low-gi carbs (not sug­ary bakes, sweet­ened drinks and pro­cessed treats) to guard against in­flam­ma­tion.

Q4 WHICH OF TH­ESE CAN MAKE YOUR PUD­DING TASTE SWEETER, WITH­OUT ADDING EX­TRA CALO­RIES?

An­swer: A and C. As well as en­cour­ag­ing you to eat more slowly, sam­pling food from a smaller spoon makes it taste sweeter, ac­cord­ing to a study in the jour­nal Flavour.

Want to fur­ther en­hance your sen­sory ex­pe­ri­ence? A study by Yale Univer­sity found we en­joy in­dul­gent food more when shar­ing it with an­other per­son. Best or­der big then.

Q5 WHICH OF TH­ESE IS MORE AD­DIC­TIVE?

An­swer: B. If food is your drug of choice, you can con­sider su­gar a class A. Re­search pub­lished in the Amer­i­can Jour­nal Of

Clin­i­cal Nutrition found that the sub­stance lights up the brain’s plea­sure sys­tem in a way other foods do not, in­creas­ing the urge to overindulge. Ab­stain­ing from your af­ter-din­ner tiramisu in favour of the cheese­board is an en­joy­able way to go clean. Pass the pickle.

YOUR ‘ADDED SUG­ARS’ LIMIT IS EQUIV­A­LENT TO HOW MANY GLASSES OF AP­PLE JUICE?

1 A❏

2 B❏

4 C❏

An­swer: B. The NHS limit of added sug­ars is 30g a day (the sug­ars in milk and whole fruits and veg­eta­bles don’t count). That’s equiv­a­lent to two 150ml glasses of ap­ple juice, three scoops of salted caramel ice cream or a loaf of white bread. A bal­anced diet in­deed.

A ❏ En­hance B❏ Wipe C❏ Con­fuse

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