LESSONS LEARNED

Yachting Monthly - - THE LEARNING CURVE -

CHOOSE THE RIGHT SAILPLAN 1

The area we were sail­ing through had nu­mer­ous buoys with flags but they were not very vis­i­ble. Goosewinged with a whisker pole was not the right sailplan for rapid course changes.

In such a lo­ca­tion sail­ing with the en­gine out of gear with a free spin­ning prop prob­a­bly sealed our dilemma with the wrap. In gear, it is pos­si­ble that we would have been able to de­flect the line away, or even if forced to cut it we might have been able to pull the line clear.

LOOK­OUT 2

We kept an ac­tive look­out but missed the float­ing line. In fu­ture we will as­sume ev­ery lob­ster pot has a long float­ing line and will take avoid­ing ac­tion.

PLAN YOUR ROUTE CARE­FULLY 3

Try and sail away from fre­quently pot­ted ar­eas by di­vert­ing as nec­es­sary. Night­time might not prove so easy.

CHECK THE TIDE 4

Be mind­ful of tide height, set and wind di­rec­tion. Low tide would very likely leave more line on the sur­face and a rea­son­able breeze and ti­dal set ex­tend the line fur­ther from its nor­mal po­si­tion.

PRE­PARE TO CALL FOR HELP 5

Even with the above pre­cau­tions, a long float­ing line is a real and po­ten­tially dan­ger­ous ob­sta­cle that can put crew and ves­sel in im­mi­nent dan­ger. If in any doubt, be pre­pared to make at least a PAN PAN call or even a MAY­DAY.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.