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Susie Goodall dis­masted

• Boat scrap­page scheme • Greek taxes

British yachtswoman Susie Goodall has been res­cued from the South­ern Ocean after a ‘fe­ro­cious’ storm left her Rustler 36, DHL Starlight dis­masted.

The Golden Globe Race com­peti­tor was evac­u­ated onto the Hong Kon­greg­is­tered cargo ship, Tian Fu via a crane winch after wait­ing more than 50 hours for as­sis­tance.

The first the world knew of her suc­cess­ful res­cue was via a mes­sage on Goodall’s Twit­ter ac­count stat­ing: ‘On the ship!!!’.

At the time of go­ing to press, ex­act de­tails of the evac­u­a­tion hadn’t been re­leased. The ini­tial plan had been for the 29-year-old solo sailor to mo­tor DHL Starlight up against the lee side of the cargo ves­sel, grab the hook from a deck crane and get lifted up by her life har­ness, but there were re­ports of prob­lems with the yacht’s en­gine.

Goodall’s or­deal, some 2,000 miles west of Cape Horn, be­gan on 5 De­cem­ber 2018 while sail­ing in 60-knot winds and seven-me­tre seas.

Her EPIRB was ac­ti­vated just after 1030 and was picked up by HM Coast­guard’s Na­tional Mar­itime Op­er­a­tions Cen­tre in Fare­ham.

Goodall, who was in fourth place, had been bat­tling the storm for more than 24 hours. Speak­ing to Race HQ she said: ‘I have been dis­masted. The boat is de­stroyed. I can’t make up a jury rig. The only thing left is the hull and deck, which re­main in­tact. We were pitch­poled and I was thrown across the cabin and knocked out for a while.’

Goodall, who after sev­eral knock­downs in the south­ern In­dian Ocean had changed her storm tac­tics, favour­ing warps and hand steer­ing over a drogue, said that be­fore the dis­mast­ing she had felt ‘in con­trol’. But then the safety tube on her Mon­i­tor self-steer­ing broke and she was forced to trail a drogue astern and take down the main­sail. She was down below when the boat was pitch­poled, and when she re­turned on deck to as­sess the dam­age, found that the line at­tached to the drogue had parted.

The res­cue op­er­a­tion was co-or­di­nated by the Mar­itime Res­cue Co­or­di­na­tion Cen­tre (MRCC), Chile.

In a state­ment, Goodall’s fam­ily thanked all those in­volved, and said it was ‘with a heavy heart Susie left DHL Starlight to fend for her­self, be­fore she fills with wa­ter and rests on the Pa­cific Ocean floor.

‘DHL Starlight has been her home for the past few years; a faith­ful friend who stood up valiantly to all the el­e­ments, a guardian un­til their last mo­ments to­gether. ‘When she was younger, Susie loved do­ing som­er­saults on tram­po­lines. We just never thought she’d do one in a boat,’ con­cluded the state­ment.

Goodall is the fourth Golden Globe Race en­trant to be res­cued due to their boat be­ing dis­masted.

There are now just five skip­pers left in the event, which is de­signed to cel­e­brate the ‘Golden Age’ of sail­ing. Un­der the rules, all en­trants must only use the same equip­ment used by Sir Robin Knox-john­ston aboard Suhaili in the orig­i­nal 1968-69 race. Some ex­cep­tions have been made for safety rea­sons.

Cur­rent race leader, Jean-luc Van Den Heede, is pre­dict­ing he will cross the fin­ish line in Les Sables d’olonne, France on 23 Jan­uary 2019.

Mean­while, all skip­pers are now sub­ject to a new rule ban­ning po­si­tion re­port­ing over the HAM and SSB ra­dio net­work after it tran­spired that some com­peti­tors were re­ceiv­ing daily po­si­tion re­ports taken from the race’s Live Tracker, which or­gan­is­ers said went ‘against the spirit of the GGR.’

En­trants who re­ceive GPS co-or­di­nates of en­trants from the GGR Live tracker or AIS Ma­rine Traf­fic will face a 48-hour time penalty for the first of­fence or dis­qual­i­fi­ca­tion for fur­ther of­fences.

ABOVE: Susie Goodall was in fourth po­si­tion be­fore dis­mast­ing IN­SET: A drogue was be­ing trailed be­fore DHL Starlight pitch­poled

ABOVE RIGHT: A crew mem­ber of the Tian Fu cap­tured the mo­ment Susie is winched to safety

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