LES­SONS LEARNED

Yachting Monthly - - THE LEARNING CURVE -

1 CREW ARE IM­POR­TANT

I was lucky I had Gor­don as my crew on board. Given that I fre­quently sail solo the Greek gods were def­i­nitely on my side that day for I sim­ply would not have man­aged alone. Brief­ing crew is vi­tal. We carry a de­tailed set of brief­ing notes in­clud­ing how to start the en­gine, how to make a May­day, man over­board et al.

2 KNOW YOUR MAY­DAY

Gor­don did very well, show­ing how im­por­tant it is to brief your crew on read­ing a GPS po­si­tion, us­ing the VHF ra­dio and the May­day prompt card.

3 KEEP UP TO DATE

Gor­don sug­gested I re­write my ra­dio pro­ce­dure brief­ing note to bring it into the 21st Cen­tury, which I have done. When the orig­i­nal ra­dio was re­placed about five years ago I had omit­ted to up­date the ‘turn on’ pro­ce­dure, which caused a mi­nor de­lay as Gor­don had to lo­cate the switch.

4 HEALTH IN­SUR­ANCE

I carry an EHIC card fixed in­side my pass­port. A note of this was taken by the clinic who re­fused my prof­fered travel In­sur­ance. In Tur­key as a tourist you would not be treated with­out a valid travel in­sur­ance cer­tifi­cate. As a rule you would not be ad­mit­ted to a state type hos­pi­tal but only a mod­ern pri­vate hos­pi­tal with full fa­cil­i­ties where they check your in­sur­ance on ad­mis­sion.

5 RECOG­NIS­ING A STROKE

I have learned that any­body can suf­fer a stroke at al­most any time. There is very lit­tle first aid treat­ment that can be of­fered ex­cept to recog­nise it (FAST: face, arms, speech, time) and to seek pro­fes­sional in­ter­ven­tion ur­gently. As my wife trav­elled, she re­ceived med­i­cal ad­vice that aspirin would help thin my blood, as would ly­ing down and rest­ing.

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