Face­book breach ‘to hold back tech’

Ra­zor chief’s fears over con­tro­versy

Yorkshire Post - Business - - FRONT PAGE - IS­MAIL MULLA BUSI­NESS RE­PORTER Email: is­mail.mulla@jpress.co.uk Twit­ter: @york­shire­post

DATA:

The Face­book data con­tro­versy is likely to push back de­vel­op­ment in ar­ti­fi­cial in­tel­li­gence (AI) ham­per­ing the progress of au­to­ma­tion, ac­cord­ing to a tech­nol­ogy com­pany boss.

Jamie Hin­ton, CEO of Ra­zor, says the news will im­pact on things such as au­tonomous cars.

THE FACE­BOOK data con­tro­versy is likely to push back de­vel­op­ment in ma­chine learn­ing and ar­ti­fi­cial in­tel­li­gence (AI) ham­per­ing the progress of au­to­ma­tion, ac­cord­ing to a tech­nol­ogy com­pany boss.

Sh­effield-based Ra­zor helps solve busi­ness prob­lems through the use of tech­nol­ogy. It builds web ap­pli­ca­tions, ar­ti­fi­cially in­tel­li­gent bots and au­to­mates pro­cesses.

Jamie Hin­ton, CEO of Ra­zor, says the news of Face­book users hav­ing their data breached is likely to im­pact on things such as au­tonomous cars as peo­ple are likely to be more cau­tious about their data.

Speak­ing to The York­shire Post, Mr Hin­ton said: “Even my mum is very, very aware of what’s go­ing on. It gets into the news and peo­ple be­come more aware of it.

“It will have an im­pact on the ma­chine learn­ing and AI that we all use.

“There’s go­ing to be a bit of a push­back in all of this. It might ham­per some of the fu­ture pro­gres­sion around things like au­tonomous cars.”

If firms are pre­vented from ac­cess­ing data then that will make it harder for fu­ture tech­no­log­i­cal de­vel­op­ment.

Mr Hin­ton said: “It’s all about data. If we’re pre­cluded from col­lect­ing data and un­der­stand­ing it, then we can’t mon­i­tor and we can’t do some­thing to help peo­ple.

There’s a fine bal­ance of ac­tu­ally us­ing it ap­pro­pri­ately and in­ap­pro­pri­ately.”

Ra­zor, which em­ploys 13 staff, re­cently helped de­sign, de­liver and roll-out a new mo­bile tech­nol­ogy strat­egy for Vir­gin Trains East Coast. Talks are under way around do­ing more work with the train op­er­a­tor, ac­cord­ing to the CEO of Ra­zor.

Busi­nesses should look at what prob­lem tech­nol­ogy solves rather than just adopt­ing it for the sake of adopt­ing, Mr Hin­ton warned.

He said: “Too many busi­nesses see in the news things such as AI. They say, ‘We bet­ter do some­thing with that’ but they’re not ask­ing what prob­lem is it solv­ing?”

Ra­zor spends a lot of time iden­ti­fy­ing a com­pany’s ob­jec­tives be­fore match­ing it with a tech­ni­cal strat­egy.

It then cre­ates ac­tions through the use of tech­nol­ogy.

Mr Hin­ton said: “I be­lieve there are a lot of com­pa­nies that are do­ing stuff for the sake of do­ing them. They see things like Block­buster go­ing under and they just think we’ll do some­thing, we’ll have an in­no­va­tion, but they’re not co­or­di­nated.

“Does ev­ery com­pany need a bot? No. What prob­lem are they try­ing to solve?

“A lot of the times there’s so much em­pha­sis on us­ing tech­nol­ogy to get more cus­tomers. Do you always want to get more cus­tomers?

“Why don’t you ac­tu­ally solve the prob­lems where you’re los­ing them.”

“Where projects have failed is where they put the tech­nol­ogy first and not the peo­ple,” Mr Hin­ton said.

“That’s why we have an em­pha­sis on that here. It’s the lifeblood of ev­ery­thing we do.”

I be­lieve there are a lot of firms do­ing stuff for the sake of do­ing them. James Hin­ton, chief ex­ec­u­tive of Ra­zor

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