Chem­i­cal capon­is­ing is il­le­gal in the UK

Your Chickens - - Ask The Vet -

QWhat is a capon and can you get them in the UK? I need to sort out the cock­erels that I have bred.

AVic­to­ria says: Cre­at­ing a capon in­volved neu­ter­ing a male chicken to make the meat more ten­der be­fore the ded­i­cated and fast-grow­ing broiler was de­vel­oped in the 1930s to the 1950s. Chem­i­cal capon­is­ing has been il­le­gal in the UK for many years due to the chem­i­cal re­main­ing in the bird, so please do not look at poul­try fo­rums abroad where they still caponise chick­ens and think that you can do the same in the UK.

You can eat your own cock­erels any time you want, as long as they are large enough for the pur­pose. If you are wor­ried about them crow­ing, there is noth­ing le­gal that can be done about this.

If young cock­erels are kept dark for at least 12 hours daily it can de­lay their noise, but they will even­tu­ally crow. The re­pro­duc­tive im­plant which helps ex-bats to stop lay­ing does not work in cock­erels and why eat com­pounds which are ba­si­cally un­nec­es­sary in any case?

Have a plan in place if you are breed­ing chick­ens in or­der to deal with the in­evitable 50% of males that ap­pear. Small­hold­ing is all about know­ing where your food has come from and how it has been reared.

It is im­por­tant to have a plan in place if you are breed­ing chick­ens in or­der to deal with the in­evitable 50% of males

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