HOME REME­DIES FOR BLOCKED CROP TAKE TIME AND PA­TIENCE BUT OF­TEN WORK IN THE END

Your Chickens - - Ask The Vet -

QMy chicken has had a blocked crop for al­most a week now. I’ve tried live yo­ghurt and the star­va­tion method, but ev­ery morn­ing she still has a full crop. She is still walk­ing and will eat. How do I cure the blocked crop?

ABen says: The first thing to un­der­stand about the crop is that it is a sim­ple sac with skele­tal mus­cle to aid con­trac­tion and it has the sole pur­pose of food stor­age prior to it en­ter­ing the di­ges­tive tract. It will stretch eas­ily to ac­com­mo­date large par­ti­cles, but it has a rel­a­tively small hole upon its exit. You must en­sure that your bird does not have ac­cess to large par­ti­cles of food, such as grass, while hav­ing prob­lems. In­sol­u­ble grass fi­bres from long, un­cut lawns will soon have the po­ten­tial to block the crop. While food con­tin­ues to ac­cu­mu­late in the crop with­out be­ing moved on, it will start to break down and soon yeasts and bac­te­ria will start grow­ing on the me­dia.

Many of the home reme­dies take time and pa­tience, but of­ten work in the end. If your hen is be­com­ing pro­gres­sively worse, my ad­vice would be to visit your near­est chicken friendly vet prac­tice where they can per­form surgery to re­move the con­tent of the crop. Although a sim­ple pro­ce­dure, it does come with in­her­ent risks. Hav­ing said this, I have been suc­cess­ful sev­eral times and with good af­ter­care birds can make a full re­cov­ery.

The crop is a sim­ple sac with skele­tal mus­cle to aid con­trac­tion

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