Use flex­ion to sur­vive spook­ing

Your Horse (UK) - - Better Riding -

Some­times all it takes is a quick con­ver­sa­tion with your horse to dis­tract him from what he be­lieves is a mon­ster

For the Lon­don City Po­lice, keep­ing your horse go­ing for­ward what­ever the sit­u­a­tion is rule num­ber one, and this also works for ev­ery horse rider. When rid­ing out, a horse can­not have an ‘exit at­ti­tude’ to a sit­u­a­tion. So, if your horse locks onto a road sign that’s blown over in the wind, then you need to re­act quickly. “We have to be quick to send our horses for­ward and keep that mo­men­tum go­ing,” says Kim. “To do this, we ‘hug’ them with our legs and use flex­ion away from the hazard that’s dis­tract­ing them. We try to keep their body straight to keep them go­ing directly for­ward. If your horse locks onto some­thing then it be­comes twice as scary as it needs to be, and if his quar­ters start to swing out you’re half­way to­wards a turn, which is dan­ger­ous if you’re in any kind of traf­fic sit­u­a­tion.” Some­times all it takes is a quick con­ver­sa­tion with your horse to dis­tract him from what he be­lieves is a mon­ster. “Flex his head away from the ob­ject and wig­gle the reins a lit­tle bit. It sounds silly, but some­times it’s just a way of tak­ing him out of the sit­u­a­tion and fo­cus­ing him on you again,” ex­plains Kim.

When a horse locks onto an ob­ject, you must turn his at­ten­tion back on you

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