Albuquerque Journal

NBA is juggling far more than basketball

Pandemic, social issues part of puzzle

- BY TIM REYNOLDS

The foremost priority in the NBA right now is health, keeping everyone in the league and around the game as safe as possible while playing as the coronaviru­s pandemic still rages.

The next priority for players: shining light on issues where they feel true equality doesn’t exist. Basketball is a clear third. Games are still extremely important; the quest for wins and championsh­ips is why players and coaches get paid millions of dollars, some of them tens of millions of dollars, per year. But for the most part, there’s a sense of perspectiv­e around the league after nearly a year of turbulence — with the COVID-19 fight and struggle against the ongoing issue of racial injustice topping the players’ to-do lists.

It seemed like the annual celebratio­n of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s life was different this year. Yes, there were many tributes and words at arenas around the league Monday, but the celebratio­ns seemed to prompt many in the NBA to reflect more than usual on what matters most.

“I think sports should be a model for greater society,” Wayne

Embry, the NBA’s first Black general manager, said this week. “You’ve got people, players, coaches, front office staff coming from various background for a common cause — and that’s to win.

“In the locker room, we establish a mutual respect for each other — that we play for each other. Respect is the key word. Respect for the human race is important. Disrespect brings about chaos and turmoil, which brings about hatred. Hatred brings about racism, antisemiti­sm, sexism and conflict. And conflict can destroy a civilizati­on.”

The NBA is apparently trying to be the type of model that Embry referenced.

It was the first major U.S. pro league to shut down in March 2020, when it became evident that it was no longer safe to play as the virus was spreading. It used its copious platform last summer to spread messages of unity: In the restart bubble the words “Black Lives Matter” were painted at midcourt in huge block letters. LeBron James got people to vote, Chris Paul got on the campaign trail, Mo Bamba worked a voting center, Malcolm Brogdon marched and spoke out amid chaos. There were countless other examples.

NBA players and coaches spoke out last year about the need for societal change. The league, while trying to balance its own economic challenges amid the virus, has stressed mask-wearing and social-distancing as ways to combat COVID-19 — though after postponing more than a dozen games in the last week or so, even those methods aren’t foolproof.

Still, there seems to be a perspectiv­e around the league unlike ever before.

“Basketball is very important, don’t get me wrong, but you do have to keep perspectiv­e as we go through this,” Detroit coach Dwane Casey said. “We will make it through it. The NBA is doing a great job of taking care of us to make sure we are safe, but the only thing that is in control right now is that … virus.”

In a time when 400,000 Americans have died, players acknowledg­e there’s more to life than a bad call or a tough loss.

Monday was an opportunit­y for the players to show they are continuing to take action in their other fight: to spur social change.

The National Basketball Players Associatio­n is still working with lawmakers with hopes of making some version of what was called the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act — a bill that would increase accountabi­lity following police misconduct and eliminate discrimina­tory police practices, among other things — the rule of law sooner than later. James’ “More Than A Vote” initiative was never intended to be a one-election-cycle event. NBA teams have pledged $300 million toward new causes designed to aid Black businesses and communitie­s.

Tuesday night

JAZZ 118, PELICANS 102: In Salt Lake City, Donovan Mitchell had 28 points — and made four of Utah’s 21 3-pointers — as the Jazz posted its sixth straight victory.

Rudy Gobert had 13 points, 18 rebounds, and three blocks for Utah.

Zion Williamson scored 32 points for New Orleans.

NUGGETS 119, THUNDER 101: In Denver, Nikola Jokic had 27 points and 12 rebounds in a rout for Denver.

Paul Millsap finished with 13 points and 12 rebounds. The Nuggets have won six straight over the Thunder at home.

 ?? TODD KIRKLAND/ASSOCIATED PRESS ?? Members of the Atlanta Hawks on Monday wore shirts commemorat­ing Martin Luther King Jr. Day around the country when they faced the Minnesota Timberwolv­es.
TODD KIRKLAND/ASSOCIATED PRESS Members of the Atlanta Hawks on Monday wore shirts commemorat­ing Martin Luther King Jr. Day around the country when they faced the Minnesota Timberwolv­es.
 ?? MARTA LAVANDIER/ASSOCIATED PRESS ?? Members of the Miami Heat and Detroit Pistons hold a “I Have a Dream” banner in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. during their game on Monday night in Miami.
MARTA LAVANDIER/ASSOCIATED PRESS Members of the Miami Heat and Detroit Pistons hold a “I Have a Dream” banner in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. during their game on Monday night in Miami.

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