Albuquerque Journal

WHAT A SAP!

Maple syrup: It’s not just for pancakes

- BY DANIEL NEMAN

You may as well admit it. It’s nothing to be ashamed of. You do it. We all do it. When you cook with maple syrup, and some of the syrup clings tenaciousl­y to the measuring spoon or cup, you wipe it out with your finger and then lick the syrup off the finger. Don’t you? Of course you do. Whenever winter rolls around, I have maple syrup on my mind and on my finger — wait, never mind, it’s not on my finger anymore. Usually beginning in late January, when the nights are cold but the temperatur­e rises above freezing by day, the sap in sugar maple trees starts to flow.

Many people, if not most, do not think to use maple syrup for cooking savory dishes. That’s a shame. The sweet maple flavor adds a boost to any number of foods. It’s a must-have on roasted butternut squash or Brussels sprouts. It’s great as an ingredient in salty spiced nuts. And it is a delight mixed in with pumpkin soup.

I tested the versatilit­y of maple syrup with four dishes.

I should point out that I used real maple syrup. I highly recommend it, though it is not cheap. Imitation maple syrup should also work with these recipes, though the results won’t be as satisfying.

 ?? LAURIE SKRIVAN/ ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH ?? Maple-walnut pie is reminiscen­t of pecan pie.
LAURIE SKRIVAN/ ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH Maple-walnut pie is reminiscen­t of pecan pie.
 ??  ?? Roast pork loin with maple glaze is even easy to make, but absolutely satisfying.
Roast pork loin with maple glaze is even easy to make, but absolutely satisfying.

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