The Hu­man Form

A new ex­hi­bi­tion for sculp­tor Alexan­der Archipenko, his first since 2005, opens Novem­ber 9 in Newyork City

American Fine Art Magazine - - Gallery Preview: New York, Ny -

On Novem­ber 9, Eykyn Ma­clean in Newyork City will present Alexan­der Archipenko: Space En­cir­cled, a new solo ex­hi­bi­tion that will fo­cus on the Ukrainian-amer­i­can sculp­tor and painter’s pi­o­neer­ing use of neg­a­tive space within the hu­man fig­ure. The ex­hi­bi­tion, the first for the artist in New York since 2005, will fea­ture 16 works, in­clud­ing bronzes, terra cotta sculp­tures and works on pa­per from the in­flu­en­tial avant-garde artist whose work fa­mously ap­peared at the 1913 Ar­mory Show, one of the first large ex­hi­bi­tions of mod­ern art.

“We have an in­cred­i­bly wide range of ma­te­ri­als, in­clud­ing some re­ally great pieces that re­ally sum up the artist,” says Ni­cholas Ma­clean, co­founder of Eykyn Ma­clean, who adds that many of the pieces fo­cus on the hall­mark of his sculpted work.“he used neg­a­tive space in such a clear and de­lib­er­ate way. He felt it was im­por­tant for him to em­pha­size the space, and he per­ceived it as part of the com­po­si­tion it­self.”

Born in 1887,Archipenko stud­ied art in the early 1900s in Kiev and Moscow be­fore mov­ing to Paris when he was 21 years old. He had in­flu­en­tial ex­hi­bi­tions around Europe in the sec­ond decade of the 20th cen­tury, in­clud­ing the Ar­mory Show in 1913. Even early in his ca­reer,arhipenko was highly re­garded for his cu­bist forms, join­ing the ranks of great artists such as Ray­mond Duchamp-vil­lon, Ge­orges Braque, Henri Lau­rens,

Joseph Czaky and Pablo Pi­casso.

“By the time he ar­rived in Amer­ica he was greatly revered, es­pe­cially in Rus­sia, where his cu­bist and avant­garde works were quite im­por­tant to the mod­ern art scenes there,” says Ma­clean.“i would say that he is still as es­tab­lished in Western Europe—works are in many col­lec­tions, es­pe­cially in Ger­many, France, Switzer­land—and the re­cep­tion to his work has had a long tra­di­tion there. Gen­er­ally, it seems that more peo­ple in Europe rec­og­nize his

name than in the USA.”

Ma­clean con­tin­ues: “What’s im­pres­sive about what he did was how he was able to work with the dis­tilled form to pro­duce a cu­bist sculp­ture. Cer­tainly Pi­casso was there at the be­gin­ning, as were some other artists, but Archipenko was there from the start, too.when he moved to Amer­ica it was pru­dent for his ca­reer, but when ar­rived he was sim­ply less un­der­stood than artists like Pi­casso or Braque, but he was at a crit­i­cal point with his fig­ures in three di­men­sions.”

Al­though Archipenko’s out­put was steady, he still didn’t pro­duce as much as other artists, and roughly half of his bronzes were cast af­ter his death in 1964, which means a show with this num­ber of works, in­clud­ing life­time casts and terra cotta works, is an op­por­tu­nity that is not to be missed. Alexan­der Archipenko: Space En­cir­cled con­tin­ues through De­cem­ber 14.

Alexan­der Archipenko (1887-1964), Seated Black, con­ceived 1934-1936, life­time cast. Bronze, 21 x 9 x 5 in. Photo by Roz Akin. Art­work © Es­tate of Alexan­der Archipenko / Li­censed by Artists Rights So­ci­ety (ARS), New York.

Alexan­der Archipenko (1887-1964), Box­ers, con­ceived 1913-1914, cast 1964. Bronze, 23½ x 16½ x 16 in. Photo by Roz Akin. Art­work © Es­tate of Alexan­der Archipenko / Li­censed by Artists Rights So­ci­ety (ARS), New York. Alexan­der Archipenko (1887-1964), Seated Fig­ure, ex­e­cuted 1936. Ter­ra­cotta, 15½ x 9 x 4 in. Photo by Roz Akin. Art­work © Es­tate of Alexan­der Archipenko / Li­censed by Artists Rights So­ci­ety (ARS), New York.

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