THE RIGHT BOW ON THE GO

SUR­VIVAL ARCHERY SYS­TEMS’ NEW, PACK­ABLE ATMOS TAKE­DOWN BOW

American Survival Guide - - CONTENTS - By Larry Schwartz

Sur­vival Archery Sys­tems’ new, pack­able Atmos Take­down Bow

Acou­ple of years ago, I did a re­view of the lead­ing sur­vival bows on the mar­ket. One of them was the Re­con from Sur­vival Archery Sys­tems (SAS). It was a well-thought-out de­sign, and it shot well. So, when Amer­i­can Sur­vival Guide Ed­i­tor Mike Mc­court asked me if I were in­ter­ested in do­ing a re­view of a new take­down bow from the same com­pany, I quickly agreed.

That bow is the new Atmos Com­pact Mod­ern Long­bow.

SOME BACK­GROUND

Doug Shad­well, the di­rec­tor and owner of Sur­vival Archery Sys­tems, has been an archer and bowhunter for years. Start­ing in late 2015, af­ter the suc­cess of his Re­con fold­ing sur­vival bow, he be­gan get­ting re­quests from cus­tomers to add holes for sights, bow­fish­ing mounts and dif­fer­ent types of ar­row rests. Oth­ers asked him to make his bows cen­ter-shot to make it eas­ier to tune and aim them.

This wasn’t fea­si­ble from a struc­tural per­spec­tive, so Shad­well de­cided to think out­side the box: In 2017, he set­tled on build­ing a new riser for a new bow. It would cater to the larger archery mar­ket so that com­pound and re­curve shoot­ers could have an op­tion for a com­pact, back­pack­able bow that felt more fa­mil­iar to them than the fold­ing bows he al­ready of­fered. It would not only feel fa­milia but also look sim­i­lar. With those qual­i­ties in­te­grated, he felt he had some­thing that would garner the in­ter­est of many archers.

DE­SIGN

To achieve these goals, SAS de­fined the fol­low­ing de­sign cri­te­ria for its new bow: • Made in the U.S.A.

• 31-inch max­i­mum draw

• Must not stack

• Fit into a stan­dard 22-inch back­pack

• Feel fa­mil­iar to all archers

• Weigh be­tween 2.4 and 2.8 pounds

• Must be durable

• Must be cor­ro­sion re­sis­tant and weath­er­proof

• Ac­cept any type of ac­ces­sory

• Able to be shot with fin­gers or a re­lease

• Can be shot off the shelf or via a rest/ whisker bis­cuit

• Has to shoot qui­etly

• Needs to look good and have great styling

This ta­ble sum­ma­rizes the char­ac­ter­is­tics of the fi­nal de­sign:

• Coun­try of ori­gin: U.S.A.

• IBO length: 60 inches

• Disas­sem­bled length: 22 inches

• Mass weight: 2.6 pounds

• Draw weights: 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55 pounds

• Max­i­mum draw: 31 inches

• Brace height/fist­mele 7.5–8.5 inches

• Cut past cen­ter: 0.53 inch

• Hand­ed­ness: Right or left

• Ma­te­ri­als: Riser: 6061 T6 aluminum; limbs: High–tech com­pos­ite fiber; hard­ware: 316SS, MILSPEC and HTS steel; take­down ar­rows: 7075 aluminum; string: B50 Dacron; riser col­ors: Camo, Cer­akote Cobalt, Cer­akote, Burnt Bronze, Blue Cer­akote, red and blue

• In­cluded in pack­age: Atmos Com­pact Mod­ern Long­bow, string, nock set, Allen wrench, 6 take­down ar­rows • MSRP: $669.95

WHEN I PUT THE ATMOS TO­GETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME, I WAS IM­PRESSED BY THE EASE OF ASSEM­BLY AND THE FIT OF THE COM­PO­NENT PIECES. IT FELT GOOD IN MY HAND, HAD A NAR­ROW GRIP LIKE THAT FOUND ON MOST COM­POUND BOWS AND WAS WELL BALANCED.

STRAIGHT­FOR­WARD ASSEM­BLY

Like most mod­ern take­down bows, the Atmos is easy to as­sem­ble. It is com­posed of the fol­low­ing parts:

• Ma­chined riser

• Two solid-fiber­glass long­bow limbs

• Two sets of limb bolts and wash­ers, both in plas­tic bag

• Six-sided Allen wrench to tighten the limb bolts

• Bow­string with a nock set, both in plas­tic bag

To as­sem­ble the bow, you sim­ply need to—

Re­move the parts from the pack­ag­ing or your pack.

. Put each limb bolt in its washer, with the wide part of the washer against the limb.

. Place a limb in the pocket at the end of the riser. Make sure the limb is po­si­tioned so that the ray string groove that is cut into the limb is fac­ing to­ward the tar­get. This will al­low the string o lay nat­u­rally in the string groove. Make sure the limb fits flush with the limb pocket and isn’t es­t­ing on the side of the limb pocket.

. Thread the limb bolt and washer through the hole in the limb and into the limb with your ngers. Then use the hex wrench to tighten it. Do not over­tighten the limbs. Do not ap­ply more ressure when you feel the hex wrench stop mov­ing, be­cause you might crack the com­pos­ite limb ate­rial. You will be able to tighten it more—but don’t do it.

. Put the bow­string over both limbs, plac­ing one end in the bot­tom string groove. Then use a bow tringer to bend the limbs and move the up­per end of the string into the other string groove.

. Once you have your ar­row rest in place, you can use a bow square to po­si­tion the nock set to nsure you con­sis­tently place the ar­row in the cor­rect po­si­tion on the string.

DD YOUR AC­CES­SORIES

When it comes to ac­ces­sories for your Atmos, the first thing you need to de­cide is if you will be im­ing it in­stinc­tively or with sights. Shoot­ing in­stinc­tively takes time to build your skills and rac­tice to keep your skills sharp. So, un­less you re­ally en­joy shoot­ing a bow and will put in the ork to be ac­cu­rate out to 20 or more yards, you should prob­a­bly go with sights.

If you are go­ing to shoot in­stinc­tively, all you need to do is ap­ply a stick-on ar­row rest (such s a Bear Weather Rest) that will hold your ar­row in place while you draw and shoot. You an also use strips of hook-and-loop ma­te­rial or thick felt to build up an ar­row plate and rrow rest to shoot off of. Us­ing a stick-on ar­row rest will be eas­ier and more ef­fec­tive for the ess-ex­pe­ri­enced shooter.

If you want to use sights, first se­lect an ar­row rest from the dozens on the mar­ket. They all have heir ad­van­tages and disad­van­tages, so try out a few on the com­pound bows at your lo­cal archery ro shop to see which style you pre­fer. With the in­dus­try stan­dard holes ma­chined into the Atmos’ ser, most, if not all, of them will fit.

The next ac­ces­sory will be your sight. As with the ar­row rest, there are dozens of these avail­able, o pick the one that fits your pref­er­ences and bud­get. They range from sim­ple pin sights with one r more pins to sights with fiber op­tics to il­lu­mi­nate the pins in low-light con­di­tions to scopes that ag­nify the tar­get for you and sim­plify aim­ing.

The sight, ar­row rest, sta­bi­lizer and quiver chose to use with the Atmos all came from RUGLO and worked fine with the new riser.

ERFORMANCE

When I put the Atmos to­gether for the first me, I was im­pressed by the ease of assem­bly nd the fit of the com­po­nent pieces. It felt ood in my hand, had a nar­row grip like that ound on most com­pound bows and was well alanced. The riser and the limbs are all the ame length—around 21.5 to 22.0 inches—and he lo­ca­tion of the ar­row rest is halfway etween the two limb tips (which is some­thing hat other bow­mak­ers don’t al­ways get right). In ad­di­tion to the fit and feel, the Atmos is also ery ob­vi­ously de­signed to be durable. While pin­ning it around in my hand to eval­u­ate its

IF YOU ARE GO­ING TO SHOOT IN­STINC­TIVELY ALL YOU NEED TO DO IS AP­PLY A STICK-ON AR­ROW REST (SUCH AS A BEAR WEATHER REST) THAT WILL HOLD YOUR AR­ROW IN PLACE WHILE YOU DRAW AND SHOOT.

alance, it re­minded me of my mar­tial arts days and work­ing with a bow staff. The limbs are stiff nough so that when they are at­tached to the riser, you have a de­fen­sive tool to block and thrust ith when it is not strung. (I think Lit­tle John and Robin Hood would have been very com­fort­able ith the Atmos!)

I was also very pleased by the per­for­mance of the Atmos on the range. Us­ing the 50-pound mbs it came with and shoot­ing a 665-grain take­down ar­row, it sent the ar­row down­range at 35 feet per sec­ond and pro­duced what I al­ways look for in an ar­row—a very sat­is­fy­ing thunk hen it hit the tar­get.

You can de­bate all you want about ar­row speed and ki­netic en­ergy, but I want my rig to shoot rel­a­tively heavy ar­row that will ab­sorb the en­ergy the bow can de­liver and hold onto it all the

ay to the tar­get. That is how you get good omen­tum for deep pen­e­tra­tion. The re­comen­da­tion for an ef­fec­tive hunt­ing ar­row with ra­di­tional tackle is at least 9 to 10 grains per ound of draw weight (gpp). This com­bi­na­tion ad 13.3 gpp.

I am not a com­pet­i­tive archer; nev­er­the­less, I was ble to pro­duce 2- to 3-inch groups with three ar­rows t 20 yards us­ing a sight. They all flew off the ar­row st smoothly and hit the tar­get at right an­gles with o loss of en­ergy due to bad ar­row flight.

The Atmos fit well in my hand, and I was leased to see that it did not pro­duce any hand hock or vi­bra­tions. This might be due in part to he heavy ar­row, but it was a plea­sure to shoot. was also very quiet at the shot, so I don’t think ny­one who hunts with one at close range will ave to worry about noise. And this was with­out ny string si­lencers on the bow­string.

With its fast assem­bly, es­pe­cially if you are shoot­ing in­stinc­tively, this is a good ad­di­tion for any­one who wants to add a bow and ar­row to their bug-out bag or back­pack­ing gear. The 50-pound limbs I eval­u­ated are suit­able for hunt­ing any­thing from small game up to white­tail deer. With the heav­ier limbs SAS of­fers, you can use this bow for any game an­i­mal in North Amer­ica. It is a durable and well-crafted piece of tackle ... and, like all bows, it is fun to shoot!

WITH THE HEAV­IER LIMBS SAS OF­FERS, YOU CAN USE THIS BOW FOR ANY GAME AN­I­MAL IN NORTH AMER­ICA. IT IS A DURABLE AND WELL-CRAFTED PIECE OF TACKLE ... AND, LIKE ALL BOWS, IT IS FUN TO SHOOT!

When your Atmos ar­rives, the box will con­tain the Atmos riser, two limbs in the weight you or­dered, the bow­string with a brass nock set and two sets of limb bolts and wash­ers. (Photo: Larry Schwartz)

Far left: The Atmos comes in va­ri­ety of col­ors, so you can sho off when you are at the range blend in when you are hunt­ing the back­coun­try. (Photo: Sur­viv Archery Sys­tem

Top and bot­tom left: The SAS Re­con Fold­ing Su vi­val Bow is the “grand­fa­ther” of the Atmos. The both use the same com­pos­ite limbs (these can b in­ter­changed if you want heavy­weight limbs f big-game hunt­ing) and a set of light­weight limb for prac­tice and small game. (Photo: Sur­viv Archery Sys­tem

Near left: This shade of blue one of the many riser color op­tion avail­able for the Atmos bo

Far right, bot­tom: The TRUGLO en­du­lum sight on the righ­tand side of the riser is a good xam­ple of the kind of ac­ces­soes that are avail­able. It can be djusted for dis­tance like a fixed ght; and, if you are shoot­ing om an el­e­vated po­si­tion, you an re­lease the pen­du­lum, which ill ad­just for the an­gle. (Photo: arry Schwartz)

Near right: Place your nock set—the ttle brass ring that comes with the ow­string—on the string about 1/4 inch igher than the ar­row rest. (Photo: arry Schwartz)

Far right, top: Be sure to put the bow­string on o that it comes off the limb on the side that ces you and points straight down to­ward the ther limb tip. (Photo: Larry Schwartz)

A set of take­down ar­rows is the per­fect com­ple­ment to a take­down bow. No need to have 30-inch ar­rows stick­ing out of your pack when your 22-inch bow is hid­ing in­side. (Photo: Larry Schwartz)

By us­ing the ap­pro­pri­ate point on your ar­rows, you can use your bow for a wide va­riet of pur­poses. From left to right are a field point for prac­tice; a two-blade broad­head for hunt­ing big game; a Judo/spring-leg head for hunt­ing small game; and a blunt for stump shoot­ing or hunt­ing small game. (Photo: Larry Schwartz)

Brace height is the dis­tance be­tween the riser to the bow­string. It should be be­tween 7.5 and 8.5 inches. (Photo: Larry Schwartz)

If you are go­ing to use a take­down bow that will fit in your back­pack, you should con­sider buy­ing or mak­ing your own take­down ar­rows. These are heavy-hit­ters and work great! (Photo: Larry Schwartz)

The Atmos is a sta­ble shooter and can give you groups such as this. (Photo: Larry Schwartz)

If you de­cide to go sim­pler route and ai in­stinc­tively, you wi need to add a stick-o ar­row rest to the ris Place it over the hol in the riser where you would screw on a more-mod­ern rest. (Photo: Larry Schwartz)

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