American Survival Guide

CAN YOU WEATHER THE CHANGE?

WHY YOU MAY NEED TO AD­JUST TO NEW AND SHIFT­ING PAT­TERNS IN YOUR EN­VI­RON­MENT

- By Dana Ben­ner Overpopulation · Disasters · Ecology · Natural Disasters · Social Issues · Climate Change · Society · Texas · United States of America · Great Lakes · New England · England · Atlantic Ocean · NASA · US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration · U.S. Environmental Protection Agency · National Weather Service · Plan B · Greenland · Oklahoma · Miami · Florida · Miami · Corpus Christi · Corpus Christi · Norfolk · Virginia · Norfolk · New Hampshire · U.S. Global Change Research Program · Normal

Why You May Need to Ad­just to New and Shift­ing Pat­terns in Your En­vi­ron­ment

As I sit and write this piece, it is the mid­dle of April and tor­na­does are slam­ming Texas and the south­ern part of the United States. A week ago, record snows were be­ing dumped on the Great Lakes re­gion, and high winds and rain were pound­ing New Eng­land, caus­ing ma­jor flood­ing.

Heavy rain and snow are not un­usual for April, but what is trou­bling is the tor­na­does that are hit­ting ahead of tor­nado sea­son. Af­ter a year of ma­jor nat­u­ral dis­as­ters rang­ing from mas­sive for­est fires in the West and epic floods in the Mid­west to killer hur­ri­canes in the At­lantic, this is just more fuel to add to the fire. What we are see­ing is not nor­mal and, ac­cord­ing to the ex­perts, it is only go­ing to get worse. So what is the cause? Bet­ter yet, what can we do about it, if any­thing?

The short an­swer to the first ques­tion can be summed up as cli­mate change. No matter what side of the po­lit­i­cal fence you stand on, there is no deny­ing that the world’s cli­mate has al­ways changed. It is chang­ing now, at least in part. Some sci­en­tists say we’re ex­pe­ri­enc­ing global warm­ing while others fore­cast the com­ing of a new ice age. What re­ally mat­ters is whether you are pre­pared to re­spond to changes in your en­vi­ron­ment and what you will do when those changes have a sig­nif­i­cant im­pact on your way of life.

The sec­ond ques­tion is much harder to an­swer. To find out more, I tapped into the work be­ing done by the sci­en­tists at NASA, the Na­tional Oceanic and At­mo­spheric Ad­min­is­tra­tion (NOAA), EPA, Na­tional Weather Ser­vice (NWS) and the U.S. Global Change Re­search Pro­gram. All of these groups are study­ing the ef­fects of cli­mate change and try­ing to find out how to best deal with it. Af­ter do­ing this re­search, I am be­gin­ning to think I need to ad­just my sur­vival plans.

Our prepping, up un­til now, has been based on the po­ten­tial threats that we have had some ex­pe­ri­ence with; lessons passed down from those who have come be­fore us. But we have never dealt with is­sues like this be­fore. Part of prep­pers’ plans has re­lied upon our abil­ity to es­cape; to head for a safer place and, once there, wait out the ad­ver­sity if pos­si­ble. That place could be a cabin in the wilder­ness or a hole dug into the ground out­fit­ted with a self-con­tained sur­vival pod.

Faced with the threats we see to­day, I’m be­gin­ning to won­der if there is such a thing as a safe place. The chang­ing cli­mate is af­fect

ing ev­ery­one and ev­ery place to some de­gree. For many, things are still man­age­able, while others have had to move on to their Plan B. All of the agen­cies I re­searched agree that global warm­ing is hav­ing an im­pact on the nat­u­rally vary­ing cli­mate, and hu­man ac­tiv­i­ties are of­ten cited as part of the prob­lem.

While tem­per­a­ture rises or drops have never been smooth or uni­form, we are in a pe­riod where the warm­ing cy­cle is get­ting worse. A great deal of at­ten­tion is be­ing given, right­fully so, to the melting ice caps and the ris­ing sea lev­els, but all of these changes also have an ef­fect on the rest of the land­scape. While some will fare bet­ter than others, no one is ex­empt from the ef­fects of chang­ing cli­mates and weather pat­terns. The ques­tions are, how bad will it get where you are and how much will changes else­where af­fect you, whether di­rectly or in­di­rectly? As with all other as­pects of our prepping plans, we will need to face this threat head on by eval­u­at­ing the sit­u­a­tion and adapt­ing the way we think and act.

Ac­cord­ing to NOAA, “Al­most 40 per­cent of the U.S. pop­u­la­tion lives in rel­a­tively high-pop­u­la­tion coastal ar­eas.” They go on to say that global sea lev­els have been ris­ing over the past cen­tury. “In ur­ban ar­eas, ris­ing sea lev­els threaten in­fra­struc­ture such as roads, bridges, water sup­plies, oil and gas re­fin­ing and stor­age fa­cil­i­ties, power plants and sewage treat­ment plants.” In a re­port from NASA, the in­creased melting of the Green­land and Antarc­tic ice sheets could pos­si­bly dou­ble the

pro­jected rise above to­day’s sea lev­els to an in­crease of 26 inches by the year 2100.

So you are sit­ting in Ok­la­homa read­ing this and you ask, “So what?” Well, ac­cord­ing to the EPA, the chang­ing cli­mate will have a di­rect im­pact on crop and live­stock pro­duc­tion, not to men­tion the po­ten­tial of more tor­na­does and floods.

Se­vere warm­ing, drought and flood­ing would re­duce yields and the qual­ity of the food we eat over large ar­eas (we see this hap­pen some­where ev­ery grow­ing sea­son). Live­stock are at risk to heat-re­lated stress and the re­duced qual­ity of their food sup­ply. With Amer­i­can farm­ers sup­ply­ing nearly 25 per­cent of all the grain on the global mar­ket, a chang­ing cli­mate will put an in­tense strain on the sup­ply and our econ­omy. Stud­ies have shown that cli­mate change will al­ter the sta­bil­ity of food sup­plies as the U.S. strug­gles to help feed the es­ti­mated 9 bil­lion peo­ple on the planet by the year 2050.

Sim­ply put, the global food sup­ply that we rely upon will see in­creased risk as cli­mate around the world changes. Ac­cord­ing to the U.S. Global Change Re­search Pro­gram, cli­mate change is pro­jected to have a pro­found im­pact on crops and live­stock across the U.S. due to “ex­ten­sive heat, drought, dis­ease and heavy down­pours.” Be­cause of the rules of sup­ply and de­mand we, or our de­scen­dants, could see a sig­nif­i­cant in­crease in the prices and re­duced avail­abil­ity of food on gro­cery store shelves. Those who ad­just their food sourc­ing plans to take this into ac­count will feel the pain the least.

TOR­NA­DOES

Up un­til fairly re­cently, tor­na­does could be tracked and recorded only by some­one ac­tu­ally see­ing them, which makes his­toric data spotty at best. Ac­cord­ing to NOAA, some tor­na­does went un­doc­u­mented be­cause they oc­curred in low pop­u­la­tion ar­eas. To­day, be­cause of en­hanced radar, a tor­nado can be recorded even if it was not wit­nessed. From records go­ing back to the late 1950s, there is lit­tle ev­i­dence that over­all tor­nado fre­quency has in­creased that much. That said, NOAA states that there has been an in­crease of tor­nado re­ports over the past sev­eral decades. Whether that’s an in­crease in oc­cur­rences or

ob­ser­va­tions re­mains to be de­ter­mined but it is be­ing stud­ied. In the mean­time, con­sid­er­ing build­ing a tor­nado shel­ter might be a good idea for some of us.

What is known is that tor­na­does are gen­er­ated by strong thun­der­storms. The thun­der­storms gain strength from so­lar heat­ing and the con­den­sa­tion of water va­por. When you add this to a front of cooler air, you have the po­ten­tial mak­ings of a tor­nado. You don’t need to be a sci­en­tist to re­al­ize that as our Earth heats up and mois­ture from the ris­ing oceans is added to the at­mos­phere, the like­li­hood of tor­na­does form­ing in­creases, of­ten in ar­eas not nor­mally prone to them. Stud­ies have shown that the num­ber of tor­na­does oc­cur­ring in the Mid­west, South­east and the North­east has in­creased.

FLOOD­ING AND DROUGHT

Ac­cord­ing to avail­able records, av­er­age U.S. pre­cip­i­ta­tion has been on the in­crease since 1900. The north­ern ar­eas of the coun­try are see­ing a steady in­crease, while the South­west is see­ing a steady de­crease.

Drought is es­sen­tially the op­po­site of flood­ing. Sum­mer tem­per­a­tures are pro­jected to in­crease some­what ev­ery year, and im­pacts are al­ready be­ing felt in some ar­eas. The Earth’s sur­face tem­per­a­ture has risen about 1.62 de­grees (F) since the late 1800s, with most of that in­crease hap­pen­ing over the last 35 years. That’s not a big num­ber but the ef­fect can be cu­mu­la­tive. The more the air heats up, the more mois­ture it draws from the soil. In ar­eas where temps rise and there is lit­tle or no pre­cip­i­ta­tion to re­plen­ish the water, droughts re­sult. The western and cen­tral parts of the U.S. are ex­pected to see con­tin­ual high heat, re­duc­tion of soil mois­ture and thus, ex­tended drought.

“WHAT WE ARE SEE­ING IS NOT NOR­MAL AND, AC­CORD­ING TO THE EX­PERTS, IT IS ONLY GO­ING TO GET WORSE.”

Floods and droughts can have dev­as­tat­ing ef­fects on gar­den and farm pro­duc­tion, which can cas­cade through the food sup­ply chain. If you’re al­ready hav­ing trou­ble grow­ing food in these ar­eas it might be time to move else­where.

RIS­ING SEA LEV­ELS

It is pre­dicted that sea lev­els will rise 1 to 4 feet by the year 2100. That is pretty sig­nif­i­cant, es­pe­cially in low-ly­ing coastal ar­eas. For ex­am­ple, the el­e­va­tion of Mi­ami, Florida, is about 6 feet, and Cor­pus Christi, Texas; and

“IN UR­BAN AR­EAS, RIS­ING SEA LEV­ELS THREATEN IN­FRA­STRUC­TURE SUCH AS ROADS, BRIDGES, WATER SUP­PLIES, OIL AND GAS RE­FIN­ING AND STOR­AGE FA­CIL­I­TIES, POWER PLANTS AND SEWAGE TREAT­MENT PLANTS.”

Nor­folk, Vir­ginia; are just 7 feet above sea level. Data show that sea lev­els have risen 8 inches since 1880, a pe­riod that has a di­rect cor­re­la­tion to the tim­ing of the In­dus­trial Revo­lu­tion. It is pre­dicted that in the next sev­eral decades, storm surges and high tides will join with the ris­ing sea lev­els to in­crease flood­ing, some­times even reach­ing in­land re­gions.

“FACED WITH THE THREATS WE SEE TO­DAY, I’M BE­GIN­NING TO WON­DER IF THERE IS SUCH A THING AS A SAFE PLACE. THE CHANG­ING CLI­MATE IS AF­FECT­ING EV­ERY­ONE AND EV­ERY PLACE TO SOME DE­GREE.”

CLI­MATE CHANGE’S IM­PACT ON MY LIFE

I rely a great deal upon what I can grow or har­vest from the wild (hunt, fish, for­age) to feed my fam­ily, and the changes in the New Hamp­shire cli­mate have al­ready af­fected how my fam­ily lives. Un­pre­dictable weather pat­terns of­ten dic­tate when and what I plant in my gar­den. They also have a di­rect ef­fect on the an­i­mals that I hunt and the fish that I har­vest.

The warm­ing cli­mate has in­tro­duced in­sect pests not his­tor­i­cally found in my re­gion. What might have seemed like sub­tle in­di­vid­ual changes have com­bined to al­ter the en­vi­ron­ment enough to change the an­nual pat­terns of the wildlife. In­tense heat, drought and flood­ing dis­rupt the food sup­plies used by wild an­i­mals, just as it does for do­mes­tic live­stock, though wild an­i­mals have the abil­ity to move to greener pas­tures. Food avail­abil­ity, or the lack thereof, will al­ter the habits of lo­cal wildlife and thus my way of life. Warmer ocean wa­ters have al­ready pushed many oceanic species out of the area, and some fresh­wa­ter fish, such as trout, can no longer be found in tra­di­tional ar­eas due to the water tem­per­a­ture in­creases.

WHAT ARE WE TO DO?

Like ev­ery other ob­sta­cle hu­mankind, and prep­pers, have faced, we must adapt. We need to eval­u­ate the changes in our sur­round­ings and ad­just the way we do things. First, I would move far­ther away from the coast, even though it’s more than 30 miles away. Hur­ri­cane Sandy gave us a taste of what could hap­pen to places like New York and coastal New Jersey, and Hur­ri­cane Maria did a num­ber on Puerto Rico and the Florida Keys. You never know when an­other one will hit, so now is the time to find a place and head for higher ground. Even without the threat of hur­ri­canes fac­tored in, the ris­ing ocean lev­els will make liv­ing near the shore ques­tion­able.

With lev­els of ur­gency and in­ten­sity that de­pend on your spe­cific sit­u­a­tion, you’ll need to do

more of what you have al­ways done: Stock up on sup­plies and en­sure you are able to pro­tect your home and fam­ily. What we are fac­ing is big­ger, stronger and po­ten­tially more dan­ger­ous than any­thing we have ever faced in mod­ern his­tory, be­cause this threat isn’t from a short-lived event, it’s from a new re­la­tion­ship with Mother Na­ture.

While in the short term there is noth­ing we can do in re­gards to what has al­ready hap­pened, many say we can slow it down. They sug­gest cut­ting back on our use of fos­sil fu­els and other forms of large-scale com­bus­tion, which put tons of CO2 in the at­mos­phere, in­creas­ing the green­house ef­fect and sur­face tem­per­a­tures. Walk­ing or us­ing a bi­cy­cle to run nearby er­rands also im­proves your fit­ness level and re­duces your en­ergy and ve­hi­cle up­keep costs. If you have to use a ve­hi­cle, com­bine tasks into one trip at a time when you won’t be idling in traf­fic. Try turn­ing to al­ter­na­tive power sources such as so­lar and wind power. Cut back on us­ing the lights and ad­just your ther­mo­stat to re­duce home en­ergy con­sump­tion. Draw upon your sur­vival skills to ad­dress the things you do that im­pact the world around you.

As CO2 has been shown to be a ma­jor prob­lem, I’m do­ing what I can to re­duce my con­tri­bu­tion. Be­sides the ideas above, I am also plant­ing fruit trees. Trees and green plants take in CO2 from the air and use it to pro­duce oxy­gen. The more trees we have, the more we can mit­i­gate CO2’S ef­fect on cli­mate change. The fruit trees will also pro­vide me with an­other food source for my­self and my fam­ily. It is not much, but it is a step in help­ing to se­cure our fu­ture.

If you are read­ing this pub­li­ca­tion then chances are that you al­ready do many of these prepa­ra­tion steps, but we as a group are rel­a­tively small when com­pared to those who do not pre­pare. That means that we need to come out of the shad­ows and teach others what we know. Share your skills and knowl­edge and lead by ex­am­ple. We are not go­ing to turn ev­ery­one into “prep­pers” or “sur­vival­ists,” but if ev­ery­one does some­thing to re­duce their im­pact and adapt to their sit­u­a­tion, we‘ll all be bet­ter for it.

For me, this is not a game and it is much more than col­lect­ing all of the “sur­vival stuff.” More guns are not go­ing to put more food on the ta­ble or make my gar­den grow. I’m not wor­ried about a zom­bie in­va­sion. I am wor­ried about keep­ing my fam­ily safe from the ef­fects of a chang­ing cli­mate. Truth be known, we are the only ones who can pre­pare for and ad­dress it.

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© GETTY IMAGES
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 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ?? Far left: In early Au­gust 2019, NOAA said there was an in­creased like­li­hood of see­ing an above-nor­mal At­lantic hur­ri­cane sea­son this year, due to the early end­ing of this year’s El Niño in the Pa­cific Ocean. The sea­son con­tin­ues as of this writ­ing but Do­rian caused sig­nif­i­cant dam­age from the Ba­hamas to Canada and took many lives.
Near left: One of the most pop­u­lar stops on an Alaskan cruise/alaska va­ca­tion, Hub­bard Glacier is a very ac­tive calv­ing glacier. Un­like most glaciers, Hub­bard is ad­vanc­ing not re­ced­ing. De­spite it's ad­vanc­ing sta­tus, this photo is of­ten used to de­pict cli­mate change, as a mas­sive piece of Hub­bard glacier calves off into Dis­en­chant­ment Bay.
© GETTY IMAGES Far left: In early Au­gust 2019, NOAA said there was an in­creased like­li­hood of see­ing an above-nor­mal At­lantic hur­ri­cane sea­son this year, due to the early end­ing of this year’s El Niño in the Pa­cific Ocean. The sea­son con­tin­ues as of this writ­ing but Do­rian caused sig­nif­i­cant dam­age from the Ba­hamas to Canada and took many lives. Near left: One of the most pop­u­lar stops on an Alaskan cruise/alaska va­ca­tion, Hub­bard Glacier is a very ac­tive calv­ing glacier. Un­like most glaciers, Hub­bard is ad­vanc­ing not re­ced­ing. De­spite it's ad­vanc­ing sta­tus, this photo is of­ten used to de­pict cli­mate change, as a mas­sive piece of Hub­bard glacier calves off into Dis­en­chant­ment Bay.
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ?? Bot­tom right: These homes were flooded by mas­sive spring rains and rapid snow melt. Scenes like this are ex­pected to be more com­mon in years to come.
© GETTY IMAGES Bot­tom right: These homes were flooded by mas­sive spring rains and rapid snow melt. Scenes like this are ex­pected to be more com­mon in years to come.
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ?? Top right: This cow is a vic­tim of the on­go­ing drought in the Sindh Province and sur­round­ing ar­eas of Pak­istan, where dis­ease and hunger among hu­mans are alarm­ingly high be­cause of the lack of enough potable water. Up to 5 mil­lion peo­ple have been af­fected so far.
© GETTY IMAGES Top right: This cow is a vic­tim of the on­go­ing drought in the Sindh Province and sur­round­ing ar­eas of Pak­istan, where dis­ease and hunger among hu­mans are alarm­ingly high be­cause of the lack of enough potable water. Up to 5 mil­lion peo­ple have been af­fected so far.
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ??
© GETTY IMAGES
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ?? Ris­ing air tem­per­a­tures draw mois­ture out of the soil, leav­ing be­hind parched earth that's in­hos­pitable to farm­ing. Cli­mate change can lead to ex­tended droughts, im­pact­ing live­stock sur­vival and crop yields.
© GETTY IMAGES Ris­ing air tem­per­a­tures draw mois­ture out of the soil, leav­ing be­hind parched earth that's in­hos­pitable to farm­ing. Cli­mate change can lead to ex­tended droughts, im­pact­ing live­stock sur­vival and crop yields.
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ?? Left: This rancher is sup­ple­ment­ing his herd’s feed dur­ing a drought that has no end in sight. Cat­tle in these con­di­tions will pro­duce less meat than nor­mal, and the rancher may need to re­duce the size of his herd un­til “nor­mal” weather re­turns.
© GETTY IMAGES Left: This rancher is sup­ple­ment­ing his herd’s feed dur­ing a drought that has no end in sight. Cat­tle in these con­di­tions will pro­duce less meat than nor­mal, and the rancher may need to re­duce the size of his herd un­til “nor­mal” weather re­turns.
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ?? Above: It may look nor­mal, even beau­ti­ful, along the New Hamp­shire coast, but the sea level is ris­ing, with ex­pec­ta­tions for con­tin­ued po­ten­tially dan­ger­ous in­creases for the fore­see­able fu­ture.
Left:
Tor­nado sea­sons are grow­ing longer, ac­cord­ing to weather ex­perts, and the num­ber of sight­ings has risen over the past few decades. It re­mains to be de­ter­mined whether the rise in recorded tor­na­does is re­lated to im­proved radar de­tec­tion.
© GETTY IMAGES Above: It may look nor­mal, even beau­ti­ful, along the New Hamp­shire coast, but the sea level is ris­ing, with ex­pec­ta­tions for con­tin­ued po­ten­tially dan­ger­ous in­creases for the fore­see­able fu­ture. Left: Tor­nado sea­sons are grow­ing longer, ac­cord­ing to weather ex­perts, and the num­ber of sight­ings has risen over the past few decades. It re­mains to be de­ter­mined whether the rise in recorded tor­na­does is re­lated to im­proved radar de­tec­tion.
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ??
© GETTY IMAGES
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ?? Right: Higher tides, higher sea lev­els and an in­creased pos­si­bil­ity of more vi­o­lent trop­i­cal storms and hur­ri­canes can make this a more com­mon sight along the na­tion’s Gulf and At­lantic coasts, with sig­nif­i­cant dis­rup­tions and dam­age ex­tend­ing in­land, well be­yond the shore­lines.
© GETTY IMAGES Right: Higher tides, higher sea lev­els and an in­creased pos­si­bil­ity of more vi­o­lent trop­i­cal storms and hur­ri­canes can make this a more com­mon sight along the na­tion’s Gulf and At­lantic coasts, with sig­nif­i­cant dis­rup­tions and dam­age ex­tend­ing in­land, well be­yond the shore­lines.
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ?? Longer and more-vi­o­lent storm sea­sons can com­bine with ris­ing sea lev­els to in­crease the num­ber and sever­ity of storm surges and high tides that can flood coastal ar­eas and reach in­land lo­cales.
© GETTY IMAGES Longer and more-vi­o­lent storm sea­sons can com­bine with ris­ing sea lev­els to in­crease the num­ber and sever­ity of storm surges and high tides that can flood coastal ar­eas and reach in­land lo­cales.
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ?? Due to the se­ri­ous 2018 drought in Ore­gon, this nor­mally pro­duc­tive farm­land was a dry brown waste­land. Water lev­els are bet­ter in 2019, but wildfires were still a con­cern as weather trended warmer last sum­mer.
© GETTY IMAGES Due to the se­ri­ous 2018 drought in Ore­gon, this nor­mally pro­duc­tive farm­land was a dry brown waste­land. Water lev­els are bet­ter in 2019, but wildfires were still a con­cern as weather trended warmer last sum­mer.
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 ??  ?? Above, left:
Ru­ined bales of hay that were to be used to feed cat­tle. Un­ex­pected flood­ing hit this farm be­fore the hay could be put up. The farmer lost their in­vest­ment in the hay and will have to re­place the food for their herd.
Right: With sig­nif­i­cant cli­mate change, food will be in shorter sup­ply and more ex­pen­sive when it is avail­able. Grow­ing even a small gar­den can help pro­vide food for your fam­ily.
Above, left: Ru­ined bales of hay that were to be used to feed cat­tle. Un­ex­pected flood­ing hit this farm be­fore the hay could be put up. The farmer lost their in­vest­ment in the hay and will have to re­place the food for their herd. Right: With sig­nif­i­cant cli­mate change, food will be in shorter sup­ply and more ex­pen­sive when it is avail­able. Grow­ing even a small gar­den can help pro­vide food for your fam­ily.
 ??  ?? Near left: These sheep have been dis­placed by a flood. There is no way to know whether this water is safe for them to drink or whether it's con­tam­i­nated by any num­ber of harm­ful pol­lu­tants that could have en­tered it up­stream, po­ten­tially putting this food and wool source at risk.
Near left: These sheep have been dis­placed by a flood. There is no way to know whether this water is safe for them to drink or whether it's con­tam­i­nated by any num­ber of harm­ful pol­lu­tants that could have en­tered it up­stream, po­ten­tially putting this food and wool source at risk.
 ?? © GETTY IMAGES ?? Wind farms in Hawaii, like this one on Maui, are one way to re­duce our de­pen­dence on fos­sil fu­els. The frag­ile pro­duc­tion and de­liv­ery net­works for oil and gas of­ten fall vic­tim to se­vere weather, in­dus­trial ac­ci­dents and other sup­ply dis­rup­tions that can cause dire emer­gen­cies if they are not re­solved quickly. A home wind tur­bine may be a good op­tion for you to re­duce de­pen­dence on the power grid. Photo cour­tesy of David Schoonover
© GETTY IMAGES Wind farms in Hawaii, like this one on Maui, are one way to re­duce our de­pen­dence on fos­sil fu­els. The frag­ile pro­duc­tion and de­liv­ery net­works for oil and gas of­ten fall vic­tim to se­vere weather, in­dus­trial ac­ci­dents and other sup­ply dis­rup­tions that can cause dire emer­gen­cies if they are not re­solved quickly. A home wind tur­bine may be a good op­tion for you to re­duce de­pen­dence on the power grid. Photo cour­tesy of David Schoonover

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