PILAR IN BRONZE

Anglers Journal - - MAIL -

I love the qual­ity of An­glers Jour­nal, es­pe­cially the slant to­ward mak­ing ev­ery­thing in it a bit of art. High qual­ity, to my mind. On that note, I thought you might en­joy my lat­est bronze sculp­ture. It’s Ernest Hem­ing­way’s Pilar fight­ing a marlin in the Gulf Stream, circa 1938. The foundry worked on it for six months. The piece is about 40 inches long, 14 inches wide, a foot tall and prob­a­bly weighs 50 pounds. It is mounted on ma­hogany.

Sculp­ture is the cul­mi­na­tion of my life’s ex­pe­ri­ences. When I was a teenager we moved from Fort Worth to Cor­pus Christi, Texas. On our very first fish­ing trip out of Port Aransas we be­gan trolling, know­ing no bet­ter, be­tween the jet­ties. My brother caught a tar­pon. We, too, were hooked. At Univer­sity of Texas, I was an English ma­jor. I was pas­sion­ate about lit­er­a­ture and read all of Hem­ing­way’s stuff. Nat­u­rally, his books and short stories about fish­ing were fas­ci­nat­ing to me.

Hav­ing been in the arts all my life, a lover of lit­er­a­ture and wooden boats, and a boat cap­tain, Pilar was an un­sur­pris­ing ex­pres­sion of those ex­pe­ri­ences. I mostly paint wa­ter­col­ors th­ese days, as they are eas­i­est to do on a boat, but I de­cided to try my hand at bronze sculp­ture. Pilar is my third piece.

Jack­son Ehrlich Beau­fort, South Carolina

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