BEST TV AND MOVIE ROBOTS

Antelope Valley Press (Sunday) - - Tv & Cable Guide - BY JAY BOBBIN

Rosie the Ro­bot (“The Jet­sons,” ABC, 1962-63) In­cor­po­rat­ing many traits of an old-fash­ioned house­keeper, Rosie ac­tu­ally wasn’t seen much on the orig­i­nal in­car­na­tion of this an­i­mated clas­sic, yet enough to keep her an in­deli­ble im­age as­so­ci­ated with the show. Ro­bot (“Lost in Space,” CBS, 196568) “Dan­ger, Will Robin­son!” Though there have been more so­phis­ti­cated in­car­na­tions of the me­chan­i­cal side­kick in later ver­sions, the orig­i­nal (voiced by vet­eran an­nouncer Dick Tufeld) re­mains the most beloved.

R2-D2 and C-3PO (“Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope,” 1977) Well, of course. Leg­endary for their beeps and wise­cracks re­spec­tively, this Lau­rel-and-Hardy-like duo (Kenny Baker and An­thony Daniels in­side the cos­tumes) made – and kept – Droids cool. RoboCop (“RoboCop,” 1987) OK ... tech­ni­cally, ex­ten­sively re­con­structed po­lice of­fi­cer Alex Mur­phy (Peter Weller) was only part-ro­bot, but it was to such an ex­ten­sive de­gree and with such ob­vi­ous cy­ber-en­hance­ments that we feel he qual­i­fies for this list hand­ily.

Data (“Star Trek: The Next Gen­er­a­tion, syn­di­ca­tion, 198794) An out­sider to the hu­man crew much like Spock was on the orig­i­nal ”Star Trek,“this an­droid (played by Brent Spiner) still was in­valu­able in what he knew about the star­ship En­ter­prise-D and its op­er­a­tions.

Ge­off Peter­son (“The Late Late Show With Craig Fer­gu­son,” CBS, 2010-14) Hav­ing a skele­ton ro­bot (voiced by Josh Robert Thomp­son, who also con­trolled its move­ments) as a talk-show side­kick was one of Fer­gu­son’s ridicu­lously hi­lar­i­ous con­ceits that gave his pro­gram a cult fol­low­ing even in the wee hours.

Rosie the Ro­bot R2-D2 and C-3PO Data

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.