LET­TERS FROM READ­ERS

Antelope Valley Press - - OPINION -

Flawed Con­sti­tu­tion

Ihave al­ways be­lieved the Con­sti­tu­tion is an ex­cel­lent doc­u­ment, al­though it does have some flaws.

The vast ma­jor­ity of peo­ple, when asked, state that they strongly sup­port the Con­sti­tu­tion. I think there are two rea­sons for that. One is that most Amer­i­cans have never read the doc­u­ment, and two, when many is­sues are dealt with, the Con­sti­tu­tion be­comes quite vague and gen­eral.

One of the key du­ties of the leg­isla­tive branch, how­ever, is clearly spelled out by the found­ing fathers. In Ar­ti­cle 1, Sec­tion 8, it de­clares that only Congress “shall have the power to de­clare war.” Dur­ing the 19th and early 20th cen­turies, pres­i­dents went to Congress and asked for a dec­la­ra­tion of war. There has al­ways been op­po­si­tion to ev­ery war the U.S. has been in, but Congress has al­ways voted for war and came up with the money to pay for it. But things have cer­tainly changed.

The last time the pres­i­dent fol­lowed the Con­sti­tu­tion and asked Congress to de­clare war was in De­cem­ber 1941, when FDR got Congress to de­clare war on Ja­pan and Ger­many. Since then, both po­lit­i­cal par­ties have sat back, for var­i­ous rea­sons, and per­mit­ted pres­i­dents to de­cide when and where to go to war. Democrats looked the other way when Lyn­don John­son went to war in Viet­nam and Repub­li­cans did the same when Ge­orge

W. Bush opted to go to war against Iraq.

It now ap­pears that Congress, mostly Democrats, are in­ter­ested in reign­ing in war hun­gry pres­i­dents and to de­mand they come to Congress to dis­cuss us­ing mil­i­tary force and go­ing to war. Don­ald Trump will cer­tainly block th­ese ef­forts. Maybe we need an­other long, mis­er­able, un­pop­u­lar war, to change things.

Ralph S. Brax Lan­caster

Go to Iran

Guy Marsh, how can you say Iran’s ter­ror­ism against the U.S. is jus­ti­fied?

Why do you al­ways take the side of Amer­ica’s en­e­mies? And no mat­ter what hap­pened be­fore Iran had no right to take our em­bassy over and hold Amer­i­cans hostage for over a year.

Maybe you should find some of those hostages and tell them they were jus­ti­fied to be held hostage.

I really think you are unAmer­i­can and you hate this coun­try, so you should go live in Iran where you would be a lot hap­pier. David Cooper

Lan­caster

Not this time

There seems to be some ire over the fact that Pres­i­dent Trump did not brief the Congress be­fore he took our Iran’s most dangerous gen­eral with a drone, af­ter get­ting a tip that he was headed to­ward the Iraqi In­ter­na­tional Air­port.

In the past, when our pres­i­dent at the time, Ron­ald Rea­gan, re­ceived the mes­sage that the Libyan leader had de­clared war on the USA, he de­cided to take him out be­fore he could at­tack our mil­i­tary over­seas, be­fore he went af­ter Muam­mar Gaddafi. He fol­lowed pro­to­col, no­ti­fy­ing Congress. He even went to Eng­land to in­form Mar­garet Thatcher of the em­i­nent at­tack, from mil­i­tary bases in Eng­land. He made a mis­take in telling Congress. By the time we flew over and bombed his com­pound, we later found that some bleed­ing heart in our Congress had called Muam­mar to warn him and on the morn­ing when we launched the at­tack, he had boarded a he­li­copter, leav­ing his wife and child be­hind and fled the coun­try.

We car­ried out the bomb­ing, but did not get him, only com­pound and un­for­tu­nately, his wife and child that were left be­hind.

Does that give ev­ery one the past, so as to the rea­son Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump did not in­form Congress for OK to take this guy out.

He would have been gone be­fore Congress even took a vote to give their OK.

In truth, the pres­i­dent is the only one known as the com­man­der in chief. Not any­one in Congress, in any stretch of the imag­i­na­tion.

As a for­mer pres­i­dent said, the buck stops here. I might add, not at Congress’s feet.

Hav­ing pend eight years in the USAF, I can very de­ci­sions are many times spurt of the mo­ment.

Many pres­i­dents have made mo­men­tary de­ci­sion to which we re­gret. Not this time.

Robert Teller Lan­caster

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