Cant­lay re­turns to golf af­ter in­jury

Antelope Valley Press - - SPORTS - By DOUG FER­GU­SON As­so­ci­ated Press

Pa­trick Cant­lay would rather ask ques­tions than an­swer them. He has plenty to say, and there is no short­age of fas­ci­nat­ing life sto­ries for him to share. The No. 1 am­a­teur in the world once shot 60 on the PGA Tour be­tween his fresh­man and sopho­more years at UCLA, but his ca­reer was de­railed by a back in­jury that kept Cant­lay out of golf for the bet­ter part of three years.

PEB­BLE BEACH — Pa­trick Cant­lay would rather ask ques­tions than an­swer them.

He has plenty to say, and there is no short­age of fas­ci­nat­ing life sto­ries for him to share. The No. 1 am­a­teur in the world once shot 60 on the PGA Tour be­tween his fresh­man and sopho­more years at UCLA, but his ca­reer was de­railed by a back in­jury that kept Cant­lay out of golf for the bet­ter part of three years.

While he was out of golf, he watched his best friend and cad­die, Chris Roth, get struck and killed by a car as they walked the streets of New­port Beach.

It was dur­ing so much pain and tur­moil that Cant­lay spent time with older mem­bers at Vir­ginia Coun­try Club, his home club in Long Beach. Mostly, he lis­tened. And it helps ex­plain now why Cant­lay is at ease equally with col­lege friends, tour play­ers and cor­po­rate lead­ers.

“I read a fair amount. I’m not try­ing to say I’m an ex­pert, but I try to stay in­formed,” Cant­lay said. “Mostly, I’m cu­ri­ous. I like be­ing able to ask tough ques­tions, to learn from some­one who knows more than me. One of the best pieces of ad­vice I got was from one of my older friends. He said ev­ery con­ver­sa­tion you’re in, the per­son you’re talk­ing to prob­a­bly knows some­thing more than you know about it. There’s at least one sub­ject he knows bet­ter than you.

“A lot of peo­ple know a lot more about a lot of things,” he said. “And they’re usu­ally ex­cited about pass­ing along that knowl­edge.”

It was that in­quis­i­tive na­ture and the abil­ity to lis­ten that paid off in other ways.

Cant­lay showed up at Ka­palua for the Sen­try Tour­na­ment of Cham­pi­ons with a cap that had “Mar­cus by Gold­man Sachs” writ­ten across the top. He signed a deal with year with Mar­cus, which of­fers a high-yield on­line sav­ings ac­count, un­se­cured per­sonal loans with no fees and a fixed rate and a mo­bile bank­ing app, among other things.

It’s the first time Gold­man Sachs, which dates to 1869, has been in­volved in the PGA Tour.

The re­la­tion­ship with Cant­lay goes back a cou­ple of years to the Semi­nole Pro-Mem­ber in Florida, which fea­tures a field of PGA Tour play­ers most tour­na­ments would love to have. Cant­lay says PGA Tour Com­mis­sioner Jay Mon­a­han put him in con­tact with Mark Fla­herty, a Semi­nole mem­ber who was on the board at Gold­man Sachs.

“He’s a good guy, very smart. We talked a lit­tle bit about fi­nances and in­vest­ments, and he’s been a good sound­ing board for me for a lot of things, pro­fes­sion­ally and per­son­ally,” Cant­lay said. “He fills in the pic­ture more than I was think­ing.

“If your eyes and ears are open and you’re play­ing pro­fes­sional golf, you can meet some cool peo­ple,” he said. “Not only cool and suc­cess­ful, but some­body you re­ally en­joy spend­ing time with, who can be life­long friends.”

Mar­cus launched in the fall of 2016 — Cant­lay was four months away from at­tempt­ing another re­turn from his back in­jury at that point — and be­gan look­ing to mar­ket it­self as Gold­man Sachs’ first en­try into the con­sumer busi­ness mar­ket.

Golf de­liv­ers the de­mo­graphic ideal Mar­cus by Gold­man Sachs wanted. Cant­lay be­came the ve­hi­cle.

COME­BACK Pa­trick Cant­lay hits from the 2nd tee dur­ing first round of the Tour­na­ment of Cham­pi­ons golf event on Jan. 2 at Ka­palua Plan­ta­tion Course in Ka­palua, Hawaii.

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