Aid dis­puted in Venezuela

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette - - FRONT PAGE -

CU­CUTA, Colom­bia — Venezue­lan doc­tors protested Sun­day at the en­trance to a bridge blocked by their na­tion’s mil­i­tary to de­mand that hu­man­i­tar­ian aid be al­lowed to en­ter.

Car­ry­ing a gi­ant Venezue­lan flag, about two dozen doc­tors in white coats called on the mil­i­tary to re­move a tanker and two cargo con­tain­ers block­ing the Tien­di­tas In­ter­na­tional Bridge where hu­man­i­tar­ian aid pro­vided by the United States is be­ing stored.

The doc­tors protested on the Colom­bia side of the bor­der, say­ing they would face reper­cus­sions for hold­ing a sim­i­lar demon­stra­tion on the Venezue­lan side.

Op­po­si­tion leader Juan Guaido, the leader of the Na­tional As­sem­bly who is rec­og­nized by four dozen na­tions as Venezuela’s right­ful pres­i­dent, on Sun­day urged the mil­i­tary to think care­fully about how they will pro­ceed.

“It de­pends on you,” he said to the mil­i­tary. “We’re not talk­ing be­tween the lines. We’re talk­ing clearly and de­ci­sively, giv­ing an or­der to the armed forces: To al­low the aid in.”

Pres­i­dent Ni­co­las Maduro has vowed not to let the sup­plies pass, say­ing Venezuela isn’t a na­tion of beg­gars.

AP/RO­DRIGO ABD

Venezue­lan op­po­si­tion leader Juan Guaido greets sup­port­ers Sun­day af­ter at­tend­ing Mass in Cara­cas. Guaido, whom the U.S. rec­og­nizes as Venezuela’s right­ful leader, urged his coun­try’s mil­i­tary to use cau­tion in a dis­pute with doc­tors over hu­man­i­tar­ian aid. Pres­i­dent Ni­co­las Maduro has vowed not to let the sup­plies be ac­cepted.

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