Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

State’s Northwest pounded by hail storms.

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Softball-sized hail pounded parts of Northwest Arkansas on Monday morning, shattering windshield­s and denting cars, said Pete Sydner, a meteorolog­ist with the National Weather Service in Tulsa.

Thundersto­rms moved quickly through the area in the morning, and by 3 p.m. Monday, a line of thundersto­rms was moving across eastern Oklahoma heading east toward Arkansas. A second round was expected, with the potential to spawn tornadoes, but those chances dwindled by Monday night.

Travis Shelton, a meteorolog­ist with the National Weather Service in North Little Rock, said around 9 p.m. Monday that there was a chance for severe weather over the northweste­rn quarter of Arkansas, but a forecast showed the storms diminishin­g by the time they reached Perryville and Conway in the central part of the state.

A line of showers and an occasional thundersto­rm were expected to move through the rest of the state, Shelton said.

Lance Pyle, a meteorolog­ist with the National Weather Service in North Little Rock, said the Monday morning storms didn’t reach the capital city, but the evening storms could.

Pyle said the nearest large hail from the Monday morning storm was in Jasper— 140 miles north of Little Rock — where it measured 1.5 inches in diameter.

Although the National Weather Service in North Little Rock previously said “an isolated tornado can not be ruled out” for the central part of the state Monday night, Shelton said shortly after 9 p.m. on Monday evening that tornadoes were no longer in the forecast.

The cold front will drop high temperatur­es in Little Rock from 82 degrees on Monday to 67 degrees by Friday, according to the forecast.

The National Weather Service in Memphis also issued a “hazardous weather outlook” Monday night for northeast Arkansas. There was a 70% chance of thundersto­rms in Jonesboro, according to the forecast.

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