Re­vival In­te­ri­ors

BUN­GA­LOW-ERA ROOMS HAVE BEEN DE­SCRIBED AS PLAIN, BUT THEY ARE WARM AND FULLY DEC­O­RATED.

Arts and Crafts Homes - - CONTENTS - —Pa­tri­cia Poore

Em­bel­lish­ments for walls and ceil­ings, along with sources for pe­riod car­pets, cur­tains, pillows, and fab­ric.

W ALL­PA­PER RE­MAINED popular dur­ing the Arts & Crafts pe­riod. Gone was the multi-pat­terned, tri­par­tite treat­ment (dado, fill, frieze) of the Vic­to­rian era. Treat­ments now in­cluded pan­el­ized walls—with em­bossed wall­cov­er­ing, pa­per, burlap, or sten­cil de­signs be­tween mold­ings or bat­tens. Most popular was the em­bel­lished frieze, placed in the area at the top of the wall just un­der the ceil­ing. Pen­dant de­signs, land­scapes, and styl­ized flo­rals all were common.

By mod­ern stan­dards, in­te­ri­ors were fully dec­o­rated, with wood­work, paint, pillows, and rugs adding to the cozy ef­fect. This chap­ter in­tro­duces fin­ish­ing treat­ments, as well as con­tem­po­rary tex­tiles that add color, pat­tern, and warmth to Arts & Crafts rooms.

left Orig­i­nal wood­work was re­stored by the own­ers of a mod­est stone and shin­gle bun­ga­low in ru­ral New York. op­po­site This Craftsman liv­ing room was added to a 1901 house in 1907; sim­ple raw li­nen cur­tains ad­mit the late-af­ter­noon light.

above Pleated pan­els of the Mor­ris de­sign ‘Le­ices­ter’ hang from rings in the win­dow. be­low The em­broi­dered table­top li­nen is re­cent work, from Ford Craftsman Stu­dios.

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