Win­dows to the Soul

A de­signer saves a 1963 glass box home from be­ing torn down, giv­ing it a mid­cen­tury edge for the presentd ay.

Atomic Ranch - - Contents - By Kristin Dowd­ing Pho­tog­ra­phy by Matthew Gal­lant Styling by Sally Julien

A 1963 glass-box home is saved from ruin and turned into an in­cred­i­ble lake­side re­treat, com­plete with a show­stop­per of a fire­place.

The serene set­ting of Lake Sam­mamish in Is­saquah, Wash­ing­ton, pro­vides the ideal lo­ca­tion for this 1963 glass box home that is a per­fect re­treat. A glass ex­te­rior of­fers un­ob­structed views of the wa­ter, and it’s tucked away so the own­ers feel like they’re away from it all.

“It’s so far down from the street that it feels like a se­cret lair,” says Sally Julien, owner of Modernous and home­owner of this mid­cen­tury marvel. “We weren’t even look­ing to buy a house at the time. We went to look at it for fun, and the more we walked through it, the more we saw its po­ten­tial.” Af­ter a ma­jor re­model and a new vi­sion, Sally was able to turn this for­got­ten piece of his­tory into the mod­ern home of her dreams.

RU­INS TO RESTORA­TION

The home was in pretty bad shape when Sally and her part­ner, Peter Lo­forte, bought it in 2011. It was marked as a tear down, and while the cou­ple saved it from be­ing de­stroyed, they ended up hav­ing to tear down most of it any­way, as the sup­port posts had be­gun to rot. “There was no lat­eral struc­ture, so if you leaned on the front, the whole house would move,” she says. “The posts had rot­ted in the mid­dle, and we had a sink hole un­der the foun­da­tion. The more we stripped away, the more we had to strip away.”

Sally and Peter are the third own­ers of the home, and Sally made it her mis­sion to honor the in­tegrity of the orig­i­nal de­sign and bring it up to con­tem­po­rary stan­dards. She asked her­self what the orig­i­nal ar­chi­tect would have done with the ma­te­ri­als we have avail­able to­day. Af­ter tear­ing down the house to its studs and re­plac­ing the beams, the cou­ple slowly built the house back up with the orig­i­nal de­sign in mind.

ORIG­I­NAL FOOT­PRINT

The C-shape of the home gives it the ap­pear­ance of a small lake house, but this 3,500-square-foot home has five bed­rooms, a dou­ble liv­ing room, din­ing room,

She asked her­self what the orig­i­nal ar­chi­tect would have done with the ma­te­ri­als we have avail­able to­day.

garage and kitchen. Sally and Peter even per­mit­ted the pre­vi­ously blocked off breeze­way, con­vert­ing it into a cou­ple of guest rooms, which added an­other 500 square feet to the home. “We made it a tiny bit big­ger, but we kept the same foot­print the home had,” says Sally.

While lay­out changes were made, Sally tried to keep the feel of the home by keep­ing the orig­i­nal en­try­way door, the same color coun­ter­tops in the kitchen, and the glass and beam ex­te­rior.

MIS­MATCHED MOD­ERN

Sally has al­ways loved mod­ern de­sign, and her com­pany, Modernous, fo­cuses on bring­ing it to other en­thu­si­asts through home stag­ing, in­te­rior de­sign and project man­age­ment. “I was the weirdo who had a mid­cen­tury mod­ern liv­ing room in 1992 when it wasn’t in style,” she says. “I’ve al­ways loved the lines and de­sign of it.”

To cre­ate a mid­cen­tury look in this home, Sally im­ple­mented a 50/50 rule for her fur­nish­ings and dé­cor: 50 per­cent vin­tage and 50 per­cent re­pro­duc­tion. “If ev­ery­thing is brand new or vin­tage or high end, you get a ster­ile look,” Sally says. “Don’t be afraid to mix up dif­fer­ent ma­te­ri­als, eras and things you love.”

“The more we stripped away, the more we had to strip away.”

The color pal­ette has the same idea of bal­ance with its foun­da­tion of neu­tral tones and pops of bright color. “Us­ing the posts and beams as a core con­cept, we took the win­dow frames and had the paint matched to the color for con­ti­nu­ity,” says Sally. “The bright or­ange started with the fire­place. It was the only ex­ist­ing color we liked, and a cus­tom color would have been too ex­pen­sive.” They then matched the front door to the fire­place color, and the rest fell into place nat­u­rally.

FILLED AND VIN­TAGE WITH A MIX TREA­SURES, OF RE­PRO­DUC­TION THE LIV­ING ROOM IS DE­SIGNED WITH COM­FORT AND IN­TRIGUE. THE SPACE HOLDS A KNOLL COF­FEE TABLE, A NEL­SON CIGAR LAMP AND THE FIRE­PLACE IS AN ORIG­I­NAL WEN­DELL LOVETT FIREHOOD.

SIM­PLE AND SLEEK, THE MAS­TER BED­ROOM IS A HAVEN, FILLED WITH MID­CEN­TURY RE­PRO­DUC­TION PIECES AND MOD­ERN ART FROM AN AN­TIQUES SHOP.

ABOVE: SOME OF THE DE­TAILS FROM THE EX­IST­ING STRUC­TURE RE­MAINED, SUCH AS THE WOOD CEIL­ING DE­TAIL THROUGH­OUT THE SEC­OND STORY. “IT USED TO BE CALLED ‘CAR DECK­ING,’” SAYS SALLY. THE FLOOR­ING IS A PRESSED BAM­BOO WITH A LIGHT BLACK STAIN.

RIGHT: BRIGHT OR­ANGE DOORS WEL­COME GUESTS INTO THE HOME, ALONG WITH A STAINED GLASS WIN­DOW THAT SPARKED THE POPS OF COLOR THROUGH­OUT THE IN­TE­RIOR. “THE DOOR IS ONE OF FOUR THINGS WE SAVED FROM THE ORIG­I­NAL HOUSE,” SAYS SALLY. “THE STAINED GLASS WAS THERE, TOO, BUT WE HATED THE COL­ORS. I TOOK A PAINT­ING THAT SERVED AS MY IN­SPI­RA­TION FOR THE WHOLE HOUSE AND PICKED EACH ONE OF THOSE COL­ORS FOR THE WIN­DOW.”

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