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A once-dated kitchen re­gains its c ool thanks to cu stom-crafted pieces with a mid­cen­tury flair.

Atomic Ranch - - Atomic Kitchens - By De­vlin Smith l Pho­tog­ra­phy by Matthew Gal­lant

PASS­ING YEARS AND EVOLV­ING STYLE CHOICES had not been kind to this kitchen in Seat­tle’s Mag­no­lia neigh­bor­hood. While the rest of the home main­tained much of its orig­i­nal 1955 am­bi­ence, the kitchen was strug­gling from the ef­fects of sev­eral decades of up­dates and makeovers, in­clud­ing orig­i­nal cab­i­nets that had been darkly stained and a mus­tard-yel­low sink likely in­stalled in the 1970s.

Be­yond aes­thet­ics, other as­pects of the kitchen didn’t work for home­owner Kristin Green, her hus­band, Chad Syme, and their two chil­dren. The im­i­ta­tion cork floor tiles couldn’t with­stand the fam­ily’s foot traf­fic. A door­way pro­vided the only con­nec­tion be­tween the kitchen and din­ing and liv­ing ar­eas. The cou­ple also wanted to in­cor­po­rate con­tem­po­rary touches into their kitchen. “We wanted the kitchen to look like it could have been orig­i­nal to the house but also have some mod­ern con­ve­niences,” Kristin says.

Ate­lier Drome Ar­chi­tec­ture and De­sign was brought in to make this vi­sion a re­al­ity. Cre­at­ing space was the start­ing point. “The re­model … took over some left­over space that was pre­vi­ously an ex­te­rior door and en­try­way,” prin­ci­ple ar­chi­tect and firm co-owner Michelle Lin­den says. “[By] max­i­miz­ing the gal­ley kitchen, open­ing up the wall be­tween kitchen and din­ing, we were able to cre­ate a larger, more open and func­tional kitchen.”

With the kitchen now open to the rest of the house, it was time to bring in pe­riod-rem­i­nis­cent pieces that worked well with the rest of the in­te­rior. Pale-wood cus­tom cab­i­netry pro­vided much-needed stor­age, and de­tails like slid­ing doors and open shelves of­fered a nod to the past.

For the back­splash, the cou­ple hoped to use a star burst­pat­terned Ann Sacks tile, but alas, that pat­tern was no longer in pro­duc­tion. “Af­ter search­ing end­lessly for tile that we loved as much — and not be­ing able to find any­thing — we de­cided not to do a back­splash, in­stead we went with sim­ple, back­painted glass in the light­est shade of aqua,” Kristin says.

The ren­o­va­tion is ex­em­pli­fied by the cus­tom, laser-cut Mar­moleum floor­ing fea­tur­ing a jacks de­sign cre­ated by Chad that mim­ics a de­sign used on the deck rail­ing. “It turned out ex­actly as we hoped and added a fun and orig­i­nal touch, while look­ing like it could have been there since 1955,” Kristin says.

OPEN­ING UP THE KITCHEN TO THE LIV­ING AND DIN­ING ROOMS HAS PRO­VIDED THE HOME­OWN­ERS A RANGE OF BEN­E­FITS, IN­CLUD­ING AD­DI­TIONAL STOR­AGE AND MORE SPACE FOR EN­TER­TAIN­ING. ALL THREE ROOMS NOW ALSO EN­JOY MORE LIGHT.

ABOVE LEFT: THOUGH ON THE SMALL SIDE FOR A FAM­ILY OF FOUR, THE VIN­TAGE-STYLE SMEG RE­FRIG­ER­A­TOR WAS A MUST-HAVE. “GRO­CERY SHOP­PING A BIT MORE OF­TEN IS A SMALL SAC­RI­FICE FOR ITS SLEEK LINE,” KRISTIN SAYS.

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