Backpacker

EXPED DOWNMAT TT 9

-

OUR TAKE Nightmare scenario: It’s -10°F outside and your sleeping pad springs a leak. Dream scenario: You packed this pad, which has six separate full-length vertical chambers, so the worst that happens is you sleep on a mat that’s still mostly inflated and deal with it in the morning. The repair is straightfo­rward, but takes time: You unfold the end of the pad, slide the tube out, patch the hole with the included repair kit, and then shimmy the tube back in. And unlike any other sleeping pad we’ve seen, you can also replace the entire baffle in the field if you do something horrific like put a crampon through it (spare baffles cost $46).

THE DETAILS Each baffle has roughly 1.5 ounces of 700-fill goose down, giving the TT a robust 7.0 R-value, which can keep you warm down to -22°F if paired with an appropriat­e bag. Discerning sleepers also have the option of varying the inflation in each tube by filling them separately—our tester slightly deflated the middle tubes for a cradle-like effect. Tradeoff: Superior comfort and versatilit­y add bulk (and cost); packed, it’s the size of a medium watermelon.

TRAIL CRED “I normally add a closed-cell sleeping pad to my kit in the winter, but this is the first inflatable pad that actually feels warmer than my usual setup,” one Alaska tester said after a ski trip down the frozen Susitna River. $299; 2 lbs. 9 oz.; 72” x 20.5 “x 3.5”; exped.com

 ??  ??
 ??  ?? SIERRA DESIGNS NITRO 800 0¡F PAGE 46 THERM-A-REST POLAR RANGER -20¡F PAGE 47
SIERRA DESIGNS NITRO 800 0¡F PAGE 46 THERM-A-REST POLAR RANGER -20¡F PAGE 47

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from United States