Deadly win­ter storm takes aim at North­east

Baltimore Sun - - NATION & WORLD - By Michael R. Sisak

NEW YORK — A deadly win­ter storm that has been tor­ment­ing trav­el­ers across the U. S. since be­fore Thanks­giv­ing moved to the North­east on Sun­day, pack­ing one last punch of snow and ice as peo­ple made their way home af­ter the hol­i­day week­end.

The Na­tional Weather Ser­vice pre­dicted more than a foot of snow in swathes of up­state New York and New Eng­land, as well as ice ac­cu­mu­la­tions in parts of Penn­syl­va­nia.

“We’ve got our shov­els ready. We’ve got the snow­blower ready. We’re pre­pared,” said Paul New­man of Wethers­field, Con­necti­cut.

The same storm has been pum­mel­ing the U.S. for days as it moves cross-coun­try, dump­ing heavy snow from parts of Cal­i­for­nia to the north­ern Mid­west and in­un­dat­ing other ar­eas with rain.

It has been blamed for sev­eral deaths.

The bod­ies of a boy and a girl, both 5 were found in cen­tral Ari­zona af­ter their ve­hi­cle was swept away Fri­day while cross­ing a swollen creek.

Two boys, ages 5 and 8, died Satur­day near Pat­ton, Mis­souri, when the ve­hi­cle they were rid­ing in was swept off flooded roads.

A 48-year-old man died in a sep­a­rate in­ci­dent near Sedgewickv­ille, Mis­souri, and a storm-re­lated death was also re­ported in South Dakota.

Du­luth, Min­nesota, was blan­keted with 19.3 inches of snow as of 6 a.m. Sun­day. The city is­sued a “no travel ad­vi­sory” at noon Satur­day and deemed the storm “his­toric.”

As the storm shifts east, flight de­lays and can­cel­la­tions are con­tin­u­ing to pile up — dis­rupt­ing trav­el­ers head­ing home af­ter Thanks­giv­ing. As of Sun­day af­ter­noon, more than 500 Sun­day flights were can­celed in the U.S., com­pared with about 400 on Satur­day, ac­cord­ing to flight track­ing site FlightAwar­e.

JAC­QUE­LINE DORMER/REPUB­LI­CAN-HER­ALD

Paul Ciotti, of Min­ersville, Pa., scrapes ice off of his car wind­shield on Sun­day.

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