Baltimore Sun

Biden leaves isolation for the first time since COVID-19 infection

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REHOBOTH BEACH, Del. — Ending his most recent COVID-19 isolation, President Joe Biden on Sunday left the White House for the first time since becoming infected with the coronaviru­s last month, settling in for a reunion with first lady Jill Biden in their home state of Delaware.

The president tested negative Saturday and Sunday, according to his doctor, clearing the way for him to emerge from an isolation that lasted longer than expected because of a rebound case of the virus.

“He will safety return to public engagement and presidenti­al travel,” Dr. Kevin O’Connor wrote.

“I’m feeling good,” Biden said before boarding Marine One outside the White House.

The Bidens spent the day in Rehoboth Beach.

Biden originally tested positive July 21, and he began taking the anti-viral medication Paxlovid, which is intended to decrease the likelihood of serious illness from the virus.

According to his doctor, Biden’s vital signs remained normal throughout his infection, but his symptoms included a runny nose, cough, sore throat and body aches.

After isolating for several days, Biden tested negative July 26 and 27, when he gave a speech in the Rose Garden, telling Americans they can “live without fear” of the virus if they get booster shots, test themselves for the virus if they become sick and seek treatments.

But Biden caught a rare rebound case of COVID-19 on July 30, forcing him to isolate again.

The Bidens are scheduled to visit Kentucky on Monday to view flood damage and meet with families. 4th set of human remains: More human remains have been found at droughtstr­icken Lake Mead National Recreation Area east of Las Vegas, authoritie­s said Sunday.

It’s the fourth time since May that remains have been uncovered as Western drought forces the shoreline to retreat at the shrinking Colorado River reservoir behind the Hoover Dam.

National Park Service officials said rangers were called to the reservoir between Nevada and Arizona around 11 a.m. Saturday after skeletal remains were discovered at Swim Beach.

Rangers and a Las Vegas Metropolit­an Police dive team went to retrieve the remains.

Park Service officials said the Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office will try to determine when and how the person died as investigat­ors review records of missing people.

At least nine people were wounded, none critically, in a shooting outside a Cincinnati bar early Sunday, police said.

The shooting took place shortly after 1:30 a.m. outside Mr. Pitiful’s bar in the Ohio city’s Over-theRhine district, a popular nightlife area. Most of the victims suffered wounds to their lower halves, Lt. Col. Mike John of the Cincinnati police told reporters.

All nine people treated at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center had been released, hospital spokespers­on Heather Chura told The (Cincinnati) Enquirer.

A police officer fired one round at a suspect who fled the scene, but it was unclear if that person was hit. More shots were fired after that person fled, so police believe at least two people were shooting, he said.

Cincinnati shooting:

“What I can tell you is that the individual that he fired at was actively shooting a firearm at that time,” John said.

Ohio suspect arrested: A suspect wanted in Ohio in the shooting deaths of four people has been arrested in Kansas, authoritie­s said.

Police in Montgomery County’s Butler Township said late Saturday that Stephen Marlow, 39, was taken into custody by local police in Lawrence, Kansas. Chief John Porter said Marlow will be extradited to Ohio to face charges in the slayings.

Officers were called to the Ohio neighborho­od shortly before noon Friday on a report of shots fired and found four victims with gunshot wounds at multiple crime scenes, police said. The Dayton Daily News reported that the victims were found in two separate homes where they lived, near the home owned by Marlow’s parents.

The Montgomery County coroner’s office Saturday identified the victims as Clyde Knox, 82, Eva Knox, 78, Sarah Anderson, 41, and a 15-year-old girl whose name wasn’t released.

Fatal golf cart accident:

Four people riding in a golf cart were killed — including two juveniles — when an allegedly intoxicate­d man driving an SUV ran a stop sign at an intersecti­on in Southeast Texas, police said.

Miguel Espinoza, 45, has been charged with four counts of intoxicati­on manslaught­er in the crash about 11:30 p.m. Saturday in Galveston, police said.

Espinoza was being held in Galveston County jail Sunday on $400,000 bond, police said.

Investigat­ors believe that after the SUV failed to stop, it struck the golf cart that had six people aboard and a pickup truck, police said.

Police Sgt. Derek Gaspard said the golf cart and pickup were traveling in opposite

directions through the intersecti­on on a street that did not have a stop sign.

China said Sunday that it carried out its fourth consecutiv­e day of military drills in the air and sea around Taiwan in the wake of U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to the self-ruled island, despite internatio­nal calls to calm the tensions.

The People’s Liberation Army said the exercises focused on testing its long-range air and ground strikes. It did not say if it will continue the drills after Sunday.

Taiwan said that it continued to detect several batches of Chinese aircraft, ships and drones operating around the Taiwan Strait, which separates the island and mainland China.

Taiwan’s defense ministry said it detected a total of 66 Chinese aircraft and 14 Chinese warships conducting joint naval and air exercises around the Taiwan Strait.

China military drills:

In response, Taiwan deployed air reconnaiss­ance patrols, naval ships, and shore-based missiles, and said that it will continue to monitor the situation.

Benin Bronzes: A London museum agreed Sunday to return a collection of Benin Bronzes looted in the late 19th century from what is now Nigeria as cultural institutio­ns throughout Britain come under pressure to repatriate artifacts acquired during the colonial era.

The Horniman Museum and Gardens in southeast London said that it would transfer a collection of 72 items to the Nigerian government.

The decision comes after Nigeria’s National Commission for Museums and Monuments formally asked for the artifacts to be returned earlier this year and following a consultati­on with community members, artists and schoolchil­dren in Nigeria and the U.K., the museum said.

 ?? ANDREW HARNIK/AP ?? Secretary of State Antony Blinken greets Antoinette Sithole, sister of Hector Pieterson, as he visits a memorial in Pieterson’s name Sunday in Soweto township, on the outskirts of Johannesbu­rg. The museum honors how South Africa’s Black youth helped to end white racist rule. Pieterson was killed in 1976 protests against apartheid, which ended in 1994. At top right, is an iconic image of a screaming Antoinette running alongside a friend carrying the body of her slain brother.
ANDREW HARNIK/AP Secretary of State Antony Blinken greets Antoinette Sithole, sister of Hector Pieterson, as he visits a memorial in Pieterson’s name Sunday in Soweto township, on the outskirts of Johannesbu­rg. The museum honors how South Africa’s Black youth helped to end white racist rule. Pieterson was killed in 1976 protests against apartheid, which ended in 1994. At top right, is an iconic image of a screaming Antoinette running alongside a friend carrying the body of her slain brother.

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