REN­O­VA­TION

A fam­ily trans­forms their dark, dated rooms to fit their in­door-out­door Ari­zona life­style while get­ting the most out of ev­ery space.

Better Homes & Gardens - - Contents -

Reimag­in­ing rooms so they work harder.

No dead zones! That was Jes­sica and Jeff Rein­hart’s mis­sion when they started ren­o­va­tions on their two-story Ari­zona house. With three kids and a busi­ness they run from home, they were able to imag­ine oc­ca­sional uses for all the rooms. But they wanted ev­ery space in the house to be more than oc­ca­sion­ally use­ful.

For that rea­son, the Rein­harts some­times did the op­po­site of most mod­ern makeovers. Work­ing with in­te­rior de­signer Jo Gick of J&J De­sign Group, they made

THE PLACE TO CHILL

A com­mon fea­ture in the neigh­bor­hood, the back­yard ca­sita typ­i­cally works as a guest­house, but the Rein­harts re­made it as a pool house where par­ents can re­lax in the AC while keep­ing an eye on the kids.

thought­ful lay­out shifts and de­sign up­dates that would not only look great but also wring ev­ery bit of util­ity from each room. To cre­ate up­stairs be­d­rooms for their kids, for ex­am­ple, they carved up an over­size mas­ter suite. They moved the laun­dry from a high-traf­fic zone on the main floor to the un­der­uti­lized base­ment and re­placed it with a mud­room. In the kitchen, they ac­tu­ally got rid of some win­dows to cre­ate more us­able walls but also widened the door to the back­yard by in­stalling glass slid­ers to bring in loads of sun­light and cre­ate a seam­less in­side-out tran­si­tion.

Other tweaks were smaller, like sim­pli­fy­ing the front yard land­scap­ing to ex­pose a porch made for drop-in vis­its. “We looked at ev­ery area of the house to carve out places to gather,” Jes­sica says. The over­all ef­fect is as warm and wel­com­ing as the fam­ily it­self.

THE PLACE TO WEL­COME

They re­placed Tus­can-style yel­lows and reds with off-white stucco edged in navy (Parisian Night by Dunn Ed­wards, which finds an­other home in­side—turn the page to see it). The new scheme feels mod­ern but works with the ex­ist­ing terra-cotta roof and Mis­sion-style door.

THE PLACE TO PLAY

There are two sur­prises in the back­yard: The grass is faux (bet­ter in the South­west), and a pro­jec­tor screen hangs un­der the eaves. “We set out blan­kets, have friends over, and stream movies from our lap­top,” Jes­sica says.

BE­FORE, MY BOOKS WERE AL­WAYS STASHED IN RAN­DOM PLACES, AND I THOUGHT A ROLLING LAD­DER WOULD BE THE COOLEST THING.

JES­SICA REIN­HART

THE PLACE TO READ

To make the most of a high ceil­ing, Gick built in tall book­cases (painted to match the ex­te­rior trim), in­stalled cur­tains at the same height, and hung an over­size chan­de­lier.

THE PLACE TO EN­TER

To keep the clut­ter of life at bay, each kid has a cubby for coats and bags and a drawer for shoes, above. Though mud­room stor­age is all busi­ness, the pair­ing of pat­terns on the wall­pa­per and floor tile gives the space a play­ful look. “The wall pat­tern is curvi­lin­ear and the floors lin­ear, so they com­ple­ment each other,” Gick says.

THE PLACE TO GATHER

Light wood floors and white Shaker cab­i­nets go a long way to­ward bright­en­ing and sim­pli­fy­ing the kitchen. There are plenty of de­tails, though, to add in­ter­est: Geo­met­ric cage pen­dants, the arabesque tile back­splash, and Chip­pen­dale-style stools have an­gles set against the room’s rec­tan­gu­lar shapes.

THE PLACE TO WORK

Jes­sica and Jeff’s busi­ness, Lu­mi­tory, is de­voted to bring­ing peo­ple to­gether IRL (that’s In Real Life, not on­line) with sup­per club kits and con­ver­sa­tion­starter cards. In their of­fice-brain­storm­ing room, be­low, they jot ideas on the walls and desk­top, both cov­ered in white­board paint, or on com­put­ers pow­ered by out­lets down the cen­ter of the desk.

THE PLACE TO PLAY

The play­room, right, was Jeff’s idea. He wanted to cre­ate a spot where the kids could use their imag­i­na­tions and play on their own. In a small base­ment room, they built a loft (com­plete with a slide) and sep­a­rate ar­eas to read, pre­tend, or work on art. Above the desk, the kids’ lat­est art­work hangs on plex­i­glass sheets hung with binder clips.

The fin­ish­ing touches: They cut win­dows into the wall and added a half door, real shin­gles, and win­dow boxes, be­low.

THE PLACE TO SLEEP

It can be a chal­lenge to find a style kids won’t age out of in a cou­ple of years. For now, the teal wall and skate­board art suit son Chase and pro­vide a fo­cal point for the long room, above, but they’ll be sim­ple to up­date. The up­hol­stered bed and mod night­stands will adapt to any look. n

THE BIG­GEST GIFT OF THIS HOME IS THAT NOW WE HAVE SPACE TO SPEND QUAL­ITY TIME TO­GETHER.

JES­SICA REIN­HART

WALL RICE BOWL DE6170 DUNN ED­WARDS

New wide trim makes three nar­row win­dows look like one larger unit.

BE­FORE

BE­FORE

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