start with A THINGYOULO­VE

Better Homes & Gardens - - Home -

KATH­LEEN WALSH, an in­te­rior de­signer, of­fers an­other strat­egy: Use a mul­ti­color ob­ject you spark to, like a pat­terned chair or rug, as a cheat sheet. You can see the col­ors work­ing to­gether, so pull out three (the magic num­ber cre­ates co­he­sion) to build your room around. But first, es­tab­lish a back­ground with a co­or­di­nat­ing color on walls and floors. Bold or medium tones cre­ate a co­coon; lighter ones let fur­nish­ings shine. Then bring in your color pal­ette through fur­ni­ture and ac­ces­sories. But avoid ex­act matches—a shade or two lighter or darker looks less for­mu­laic.

START WITH A FABRIC

Walsh pulled red, green, and blue from the ot­toman fabric’s

nine col­ors and set them in a warm neu­tral en­ve­lope.

PA­PRIKA RED

Bright red in the sofa doesn’t over­whelm the room be­cause of the equal amounts of ivory in the small-scale pat­tern.

FOR­EST GREEN

Dark grayed-back green in the throw pil­low and art­work “is about equal weight as the wall of cherry built-ins,” Walsh says.

COBALT BLUE

Tri­an­gu­lat­ing a color

through the room keeps the eye mov­ing and builds co­he­sion. Here, blues re­peat in solids and pat­terns.

CREAMY BEIGE

Walsh wrapped the room in a light neu­tral via the rug and wall color. It off­sets wood tones in the book­case

and floor­ing.

DARK EL­E­MENTS— CHAN­DE­LIER, FUR­NI­TURE LEGS, AND ART­WORK— COUNTER THE CHALKY EN­VE­LOPE. WALL COLOR MATCH: PALE AL­MOND OC-2 BEN­JAMIN MOORE

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.