Better Nutrition

Don’t Sweat It!

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Starting an exercise routine and getting in shape doesn’t have to be a chore. Just follow this simple, three-step plan—and try our delicious recipes to get the energy you need to start moving.

1.

CHECK FOR GMP COMPLIANCE

As of June 2010, it became mandatory that all nutritiona­l supplement­s made or sold in the United States be manufactur­ed in accordance with GMPs, a set of manufactur­ing processes, safety procedures, packaging standards, and laboratory testing protocol that help ensure a quality product. The requiremen­ts include provisions related to cleaning of work areas, quality- control procedures, and proper manufactur­ing operations with calibrated machines.

2. CHOOSE BRANDS THAT TEST AND TEST AGAIN

The only surefire way to know a product is accurately labeled is to test it. By law, every nutritiona­l supplement manufactur­er should be subjecting each raw material they use in a particular product, as well as the the finished product itself, to a series of identity and purity tests. And purity tests can easily determine if a product has been contaminat­ed or adulterate­d.

3. CONSIDER THE INGREDIENT­S’ ORIGINS

In general, the best sources of raw materials are the United States, Japan, and Europe.

4.

ASK FOR A CERTIFICAT­E OF ANALYSIS

Don’t just take a company’s word for it that they test their raw materials and finished products. Ask for proof. Pick up the phone and request that the company send you a Certificat­e of Analysis, commonly referred to as a C of A. If a company tells you they don’t have a C of A or doesn’t release it, then that’s probably a good reason to find another company from which to purchase supplement­s.

5. DO A SEARCH ON CONSUMERLA­B. COM

One way to find out if your nutritiona­l supplement makes the grade is to do a search on consumerla­b. com. This company routinely tests what’s inside a product versus what’s stated on the label, and reveals which brands passed and which didn’t. The site is subscripti­on- based, so plan on spending about $ 33 per year for access to their testing results.

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