Sev­eral Grammy hope­fuls have North Carolina ties

The Charlotte Observer (Sunday) - - News - BY BROOKE CAIN AND DAVID MENCONI [email protected]­sob­server.com dmen­[email protected]­sob­server.com

Fayetteville’s J. Cole re­ceived two nods in the 2019 Grammy nom­i­na­tions an­nounced Fri­day morn­ing, but not for any of the work on his own al­bum. Here are the North Carolina artists who made the list.

J. Cole was nom­i­nated

in the Best R&B Song cat­e­gory for his song­writ­ing role on Miguel’s “Come Through and Chill,” along with Miguel Pi­mentel and Salaam Remi. He was also nom­i­nated in the Best Rap/ Sung Per­for­mance cat­e­gory for his part on 6lack’s “Pretty Lit­tle Fears.” The song is from 6lack’s “East At­lanta Love Let­ter” al­bum.

Iron & Wine was nom

inated for Best Folk Al­bum. Iron & Wine is the artis­tic name of singer­song­writer Sam Beam, orig­i­nally a South Carolina na­tive who now lives in Chapel Hill. Iron & Wine was nom­i­nated last year for Best Amer­i­cana Al­bum.

David Sedaris, a writer

who grew up in Raleigh and has writ­ten about his fam­ily and time here in nu­mer­ous mem­oirs, was nom­i­nated in the Best Spo­ken Word cat­e­gory for “Ca­lypso.” Sedaris was nom­i­nated in this same cat­e­gory in 2009 and 2014.

Daf­nis

Pri­eto Big Band, a Latin jazz act from Cuba, was nom­i­nated for Best Latin Jazz Al­bum. The record was pro­duced by Eric Ober­stein, as­so­ciate di­rec­tor of Duke Per­for­mances in Durham. The al­bum was also nom­i­nated for a Latin Grammy.

“Voices of Mis­sis­sippi:

Artists and Mu­si­cians Doc­u­mented by Wil­liam Fer­ris” was nom­i­nated for Best His­tor­i­cal Al­bum. Fer­ris is a his­tory pro­fes­sor at the Univer­sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Fer­ris shares the nom­i­na­tion with April Led­bet­ter, Steven Lance Led­bet­ter and Michael Graves.

●Dom Fle­mons, of Carolina Choco­late Drops fame, was nom­i­nated for Best Folk Al­bum for “Black Cow­boys.”

One of the big­gest sur­prises of the morn­ing was that Cole didn’t re­ceive more Grammy love. His al­bum “KOD,” which Cole has said stands for Kids on Drugs, King Over­dosed and Kill Our Demons, de­buted in April in the No. 1 spot on the Bill­board charts. He has re­ceived Grammy nom­i­na­tions three pre­vi­ous years. He got three nom­i­na­tions in 2016 (Rap Al­bum, Rap Per­for­mance and R&B Per­for­mance), one in 2014 (Rap/Sung Per­for­mance) and in 2012 (New Artist).

Cole will head­line the in­au­gu­ral Dreamville Fes­ti­val at Dix Park in Raleigh in April 2019. The fes­ti­val is his brain­child and was orig­i­nally slated for Sept. 15 this year, but was post­poned be­cause of Hur­ri­cane Florence. The fes­ti­val will ben­e­fit hur­ri­cane vic­tims, the Dorothea Dix Park Con­ser­vancy and Cole’s Dreamville Foun­da­tion.

North Carolina artists Rap­sody, Syl­van Esso and Iron & Wine were among last year’s Grammy nom­i­nees.

The Grammy Awards show will air Feb. 10 on CBS.

SCOTT ROTH Invision/AP

Grammy nom­i­nee J. Cole will head­line the in­au­gu­ral Dreamville Fes­ti­val at Dix Park in Raleigh in April 2019.

CRE­ATIVE ARTISTS AGENCY

Iron & Wine’s mu­sic is at home on­stage and screen – and in Chapel Hill, home of band­leader Sam Beam.

David Sedaris

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