■ Go­ing for gold: Nether­lands brings tough test for U.S. women in fi­nal.

3 WINS, 1 LOSS, 1 TBD

Chicago Tribune (Sunday) - - CHICAGO SPORTS -

1991

UNITED STATES 2, NOR­WAY 1 Guangzhou, China Michelle Ak­ers-Stahl, cen­ter, with Julie Foudy, left, and Carin Jen­nings, scored both goals for the United States, the second to break a 1-1 tie in the 78th minute. The Amer­i­cans won all six games they played and fin­ished with a plus-20 goal dif­fer­en­tial. Ak­ers-Stahl, who led the tour­na­ment with 10 goals, scored more than 10 per­cent of all the goals scored in the com­pe­ti­tion.

1999

UNITED STATES 0, CHINA 0 U.S. wins 5-4 on penalty kicks Pasadena, Cal­i­for­nia

Af­ter 120 score­less min­utes and four suc­cess­ful penalty kicks (two for each side), goal­keeper Briana Scurry gave the U.S. an edge by stop­ping China’s third try. The teams swapped goals twice more be­fore Brandi Chas­tain, above, stepped up and won it for the Amer­i­cans, set­ting up a mem­o­rable cel­e­bra­tion.

2011

JA­PAN 2, UNITED STATES 2 Ja­pan wins 3-1 on penalty kicks Frankfurt, Ger­many

Alex Mor­gan, left, and Abby Wam­bach, right, scored for the Amer­i­cans, but each time the U.S. scored Ja­pan had an answer. Wam­bach’s goal in ex­tra time looked like a win­ner, but the Ja­panese scored in the 117th minute to force penalty kicks. The U.S. then missed its first three tries in a stun­ning loss.

2015

UNITED STATES 5, JA­PAN 2 Van­cou­ver, Canada The Amer­i­cans only al­lowed one goal in the six matches lead­ing up to the fi­nal, then poured it on against Ja­pan with four goals in the first 16 min­utes of the cham­pi­onship game. Three of those goals came from Carli Lloyd (No. 10), who scored in the third, fifth and 16th min­utes. It was the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup his­tory.

TOMMY CHENG/GETTY-AFP

MARK J. TERRILL/AP

FRIEDEMANN VOGEL/GETTY

JEFF VINNICK/GETTY

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