Four ways stu­dents are re­strained

Chicago Tribune (Sunday) - - CHICAGOLAN­D -

The cri­sis-man­age­ment sys­tems com­monly used in schools train em­ploy­ees in how to phys­i­cally con­trol stu­dents who pose a dan­ger to them­selves or oth­ers. Stand­ing and seated re­straints are typ­i­cally taught; some sys­tems also in­clude re­straints that take place on the floor.

1. STAND­ING

Stand­ing re­straints are meant to re­strict a child’s arms. A school worker can cross the stu­dent's arms over his chest from be­hind, as shown here, or grasp the arms while stand­ing be­side the child.

2. SEATED

In seated re­straints, adults use their lower bod­ies to hold the child still and se­cure the stu­dent's arms across their bod­ies.

3. SUPINE

Supine re­straints be­gin with a “take­down,” and staff mem­bers then se­cure the stu­dent’s arms and legs. Care should be taken not to put pres­sure on the child’s joints. Typ­i­cally, at least three staff mem­bers par­tic­i­pate.

4. PRONE

Prone, or face­down, re­straints be­gin like supine re­straints. Em­ploy­ees then turn the stu­dent onto his front and se­cure his arms and legs. Work­ers are told to avoid putting pres­sure on the stu­dent’s back, which can in­hibit breath­ing.

SOURCES: CHICAGO TRI­BUNE AND PROP­UB­LICA ILLI­NOIS RE­PORT­ING JE­MAL R. BRIN­SON / CHICAGO TRI­BUNE

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