THE NEW FLU SHOT: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

GET THE FACTS ON IN­FLUENZA FOR A SNEEZE-FREE WINTER

Closer Weekly - - Front Page -

WHO SHOULD GET THE FLU VAC­CINE?

Ev­ery­one age 6 months or older, ac­cord­ing to the CDC. Check with your doctor first if you’re al­ler­gic to eggs, feel­ing ill or have had a se­vere re­ac­tion to a pre­vi­ous flu vac­cine.

WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO GET IT?

Late Septem­ber or early Oc­to­ber, so you’re pro­tected when the flu sea­son is in full swing, typ­i­cally De­cem­ber through Fe­bru­ary. “We know that an­ti­bod­ies peak four to six weeks af­ter get­ting a vac­cine,” ex­plains Ann Falsey, MD, pro­fes­sor of medicine in the in­fec­tious dis­ease unit at the Univer­sity of Rochester Med­i­cal Cen­ter. “And then they slowly go down over the next six months.”

IS THE FLU SHOT MY ONLY OP­TION?

Not any­more. For the first time since the 2015–’16 sea­son, the CDC has ap­proved a nasal flu vac­cine for use in non-preg­nant peo­ple ages 2 to 49 with­out cer­tain med­i­cal con­di­tions (in­clud­ing mod­er­ate or se­vere acute ill­ness, with or with­out fever). But for kids, the Amer­i­can Academy of Pe­di­atrics says shots are a safer bet.

DOES ONE VAC­CINE FIT ALL?

If you’re 65 or older, there’s a Flu­zone High-Dose in­fluenza vac­cine de­signed just for you. It con­tains four times the amount of anti­gen as the reg­u­lar flu shot, and a study showed those who re­ceived the high-dose vac­cine had 24 per­cent fewer in­fluenza in­fec­tions as com­pared to those who re­ceived the stan­dard dose.

HOW ELSE CAN I PRO­TECT MY­SELF?

Al­ways prac­tice good health habits, in­clud­ing cov­er­ing coughs, wash­ing hands of­ten, avoid­ing peo­ple who are sick and fre­quently us­ing al­co­hol­based hand san­i­tizer.

“I want fam­i­lies to know how im­por­tant inf luenza vac­ci­na­tion can be.”

— Jen­nifer Garner

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.