JAMIE LEE CUR­TIS

THE BUSIER-THAN-EVER HAL­LOWEEN STAR HAS NO FEAR ABOUT TURN­ING 60

Closer Weekly - - Contents - — Lisa Cham­bers, with re­port­ing by Diana Cooper

The ac­tress re­vis­its her Hal­loween role and shares why ag­ing doesn’t scare her.

She rose to fame as a scream queen in the cult clas­sic Hal­loween, but off­screen, Jamie Lee Cur­tis tells Closer, “I live a very quiet, pri­vate life! I’m mar­ried to a very quiet guy.” So when Closer caught up with her on Sept. 8 at the Mid­night Mad­ness pre­miere of her new Hal­loween movie at the Toronto In­ter­na­tional Film Fes­ti­val, it was the en­thu­si­as­tic crowd that was scream­ing. “This is all sort of funny and amaz­ing,” she said, wav­ing to fans. “I love it! I’m go­ing to be 60 and I’m at a movie — that I’m in!”

Jamie has ap­peared in six of the 11 films in the hor­ror fran­chise and she cred­its land­ing the role of ter­ror­ized babysit­ter Lau­rie Strode in the 1978 orig­i­nal for “ba­si­cally [giv­ing] me the life I have to­day.” The new movie fo­cuses on three gen­er­a­tions of Strode women who are still bat­tling the su­per­nat­u­ral boogey­man Michael My­ers. But the hor­ror on-screen is far from Jamie’s happy — and very full — life.

AG­ING IS A TREAT

She’s just pub­lished her 13th chil­dren’s book, is writ­ing her first screen­play, and look­ing for­ward to cel­e­brat­ing her Novem­ber birth­day with hus­band Christo­pher Guest, 70. “[We] are op­po­sites,” she says. “We have been for 33 years, and we al­ways will be.” But they’ve made it work be­cause they’ve fol­lowed a rule she learned 20 years ago when she got sober: “Don’t leave,” she says. “There’s a re­cov­ery phrase that says, ‘Stay on the bus…the scenery will change.’ It can ap­ply to al­most any­thing.”

As she faces 60, Jamie is proud that she’s learned to “shed my own lim­i­ta­tions and per­cep­tion of who I am,” she says, so the fu­ture doesn’t worry her. She leaves the scream­ing for Lau­rie Strode. “Life is tough for ev­ery­body. That’s why we go to the movies! So we can scream and laugh, and then go home.”

“Lau­rie Strode is ev­ery­body,” says Jamie,here in 1978.

“Trauma is gen­er­a­tional,” she notes of the new film’scen­tral theme.

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