HER­BI­CIDE OP­TIONS

TO SAFELY USE WEED-KILLING TREAT­MENTS AND TO EN­SURE THE BEST RE­SULTS, CARE­FULLY READ AND FOL­LOW ALL PROD­UCT DIREC­TIONS PRE­CISELY.

Country Gardens - - GARDEN KNOW-HOW -

BURN­ING OR HOR­TI­CUL­TURAL VINE­GAR Th­ese poste­mer­gence op­tions are most ef­fec­tive on newly sprouted weeds—par­tic­u­larly an­nu­als—with­out a tap­root. Nei­ther method should be used on lawns. Burn­ing with a flame weeder should be done only on moist, calm days to pre­vent fire from spread­ing. Vine­gar-based her­bi­cides re­quire spe­cial han­dling be­cause of the high con­cen­tra­tion of acid, which can burn skin and eyes. Mon­i­tor treated ar­eas for re­sprout­ing weeds.

PREEMERGEN­CE HER­BI­CIDE

If you have a se­vere weed prob­lem, ap­ply­ing a preemergen­ce prod­uct such as Preen on your lawn or flower gar­dens in early spring helps pre­vent weed seedlings from grow­ing be­fore they ger­mi­nate, yet it al­lows es­tab­lished peren­nial plants to grow. Pre­emer­gent her­bi­cides will not kill es­tab­lished weeds.

POSTE­MER­GENCE HER­BI­CIDE

For tena­cious en­e­mies like poi­son ivy or bram­bles, se­lec­tively and care­fully spray or brush on a fo­liar her­bi­cide such as glyphosate or tri­clopyr on a non-windy day fol­low­ing the la­bel’s direc­tions. Do not place weeds killed by a chem­i­cal her­bi­cide in the compost bin.

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