LEARN TO MAKE BROOM­STICK LACE

Learn broom­stick lace with this easy-to-fol­low photo tu­to­rial and les­son.

Crochet! - - Contents - By Brenda Bourg

Add broom­stick lace to your tool­box of cro­chet tricks!

Broom­stick lace is a very open and airy stitch that can be worked with just about any yarn. Broom­stick lace is named as such be­cause it used to be worked over the end of an old sawed- off broom han­dle. Now we have spe­cially made nee­dles that we can use in a wide va­ri­ety of sizes. The larger our nee­dle and the lighter our yarn, the lacier our project will be. It works up very quickly with a broom han­dle or larger nee­dle, which is why some also re­fer to it as Jiffy Lace. No mat­ter what you call it, it's a de­light­fully easy stitch to cre­ate!

In this ar­ti­cle not only will we learn how to make broom­stick lace, we'll also learn how to make in­creases on both ends of our swatch so we can make a tri­an­gu­lar project. For our swatch we will be work­ing in groups of five stitches and will pull our broom­stick loops through the back loops of the sin­gle cro­chets. Us­ing the back loops only makes a less pro­nounced front and back side of our project. In tra­di­tional broom­stick lace you would nor­mally work through both loops. Once you learn this tech­nique you can play with any place­ment of stitches and num­ber of loops as you'd like!

To be­gin, chain 6 with any yarn and sin­gle cro­chet in sec­ond stitch from the hook and in each stitch across. We do not turn our work in broom­stick lace; our work will al­ways be fac­ing us. When the last sin­gle cro­chet is fin­ished, pull up a long loop and slip it onto the broom­stick nee­dle (see Photo 1).

Then insert the hook into the back loop of the next sin­gle cro­chet and pull up a loop and place on nee­dle (see Photo 2).

Con­tinue pulling up loops through the back loop and slip­ping them onto the nee­dle to the end of the row. There should now be 5 loops on the nee­dle (see Photo 3).

Next, insert the hook from right to left into the loops on nee­dle and slide the loops off the nee­dle and onto the hook (see Photo 4).

Pull the yarn up to the height of the loops, yarn over and pull through all 5 loops (see Photo 5).

Yarn over and chain to se­cure the loops (see Photo 6).

Chain 5 more stitches for the right side in­crease. Sin­gle cro­chet into sec­ond stitch from the hook and into each stitch across. We should now have 5 sin­gle cro­chets. Sin­gle cro­chet 5 stitches into the cen­ter of the broom­stick loops (see Photo 7).

For the left side in­crease, we will need to make foun­da­tion sin­gle cro­chet stitches. To be­gin, insert the hook into the 2 side loops of the last sin­gle cro­chet just made (see Photo 8), yarn over and pull up 1 loop (see Photo 9).

Yarn over and pull through the last 2 loops on the hook (see Photo 10). Our first foun­da­tion stitch is com­plete.

To make the next foun­da­tion stitch, insert the hook un­der both strands of the be­gin­ning foun­da­tion chain we just fin­ished (see Photo 11). Yarn over and pull the loop through 1 loop (see Photo 12). Yarn over again and pull through both loops on our hook (see Photo 13). We will re­peat this sec­ond stitch un­til there are 5 com­pleted foun­da­tion sin­gle cro­chets.

To be­gin the next row, pull the end loop up long enough to slip over the broom­stick nee­dle (see Photo 14). Pull a loop up through the back loop of each sin­gle cro­chet and slip them onto the nee­dle. There should now be 15 loops on our nee­dle (see Photo 15).

We will work the loops off of the broom­stick nee­dle as we did in the pre­vi­ous row. Insert the hook from right to left into the first 5 loops and slide the loops off the nee­dle and onto the hook. Pull the yarn up to the height of the loops, yarn over and pull through all 5 loops. Yarn over and chain, chain 5 more stitches for the right side in­crease. Sin­gle cro­chet into sec­ond stitch from the hook and into each stitch across. We should now have 5 sin­gle cro­chets. Sin­gle cro­chet 5 stitches into the broom­stick loops as fol­lows: insert the hook from right to left into the next 5 loops and sin­gle cro­chet (see Photo 16), work 4 more sin­gle cro­chets into the broom­stick loops. Re­peat un­til all the loops are worked off of the nee­dle. Once all loops are worked off the nee­dle we will make the 5 left side in­creases us­ing the foun­da­tion stitches.

We will re­peat these 2 rows, in­creas­ing on each end of the sin­gle cro­chet rows, un­til we have worked the de­sired length of our project. When fin­ished, be sure to block your swatch or project; block­ing re­ally al­lows this stitch to open up and bloom!

There are many vari­a­tions of stitches that you can use with broom­stick lace— if you can pull up the long loop, you make the stitch! Us­ing dif­fer­ent yarns also makes a huge dif­fer­ence in how this stitch drapes. You can make a very warm afghan us­ing a bulky or heavy yarn or you can make a whis­per soft shawl with a del­i­cate yarn. The only limit is your imag­i­na­tion! C!

Photo 6

Photo 5

Photo 12

Photo 13

Photo 11

Photo 10

Photo 8

Photo 9

Photo 7

Photo 1 Photo 3

Photo 2

Photo 4

Photo 14

Photo 16

Photo 15

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