Daily Times (Primos, PA)

Giving

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they’re very happy to have us doing this. I’m happy that people are coming, and they’re very glad to have us do this.”

After receiving their first dose and before scheduling their second dose appointmen­ts, attendees were required to sit for at least 15 minutes under observatio­n in case of any adverse reactions to the vaccine. Chairs were set up in the multipurpo­se room, with social distancing in mind, and volunteers would clean chairs and direct attendees to an available seat. While they waited under observatio­n, attendees could read handouts on their chair about what they may experience after receiving the vaccine, ask questions and listen to the music that was played.

Residents and physicians Tony Kleiner, 76, and Dan Kimball, 81, were two of the volunteers in this step of the process.

“Once a doctor, always a doctor, that’s the way that goes,” Kleiner said on why he decided to volunteer. “We all realize the best thing we can do to ensure life returning to normalcy is seeing as many people vaccinated as possibly can be. Any effort we can make

to see that that occurs, we think is worth everybody’s interest, our own as well as everybody else’s.”

Kimball had a similar reason for volunteeri­ng.

“We are part of this community,” he said. “We saw it as a way of honoring our community, but also ensuring that more people get the vaccine. When you hear that a third or quarter of the population are thinking of turning it down, that’s pretty scary. With the effort here, we got essentiall­y 100% of the people who were eligible to get the vaccine, we’d like to see that in the community as well.”

‘A well-oiled machine’

The pharmacy and The Highlands teams have worked to make the whole process as smooth and efficient as possible. From pulling into the parking lot to exiting after receiving the dose, being observed and scheduling the second dose appointmen­t, attendees can be done and on their way in less than 30 minutes.

“It’s been great,” Kleiner said. “A lot of cooperatio­n. The administra­tion has this down pat. They ironed out all the wrinkles and it goes very smoothly. It’s like a well-oiled machine.”

The flow starts and ends outside the clinic. Before attendees even reach the parking lot, they check in

with one of the security members or traffic volunteers. Once their name is checked off the registrati­on list, the attendee is then directed to a parking spot. They then make their way through another checkpoint inside a tent and then into the multipurpo­se room.

Once inside the multipurpo­se room, they go through one more checkpoint with Eric Esterbrook, pharmacy owner. Esterbrook then directs the attendee to a sectioned off area to receive their shot and then they make their way to the observatio­n area. When they have their second dose appointmen­t card, they make their way back out and are directed out of the parking lot.

Greg Sell, 67, was a community volunteer, who helped direct traffic.

“Seeing the way this operates and seeing the flow and the efficient of this, it really kind of makes you feel like, wow, you really are making a difference,” he said. “You see this steady stream of folks coming in to get vaccinated. I think that’s a really good thing.”

With how well the clinics have worked so far, and depending on vaccine supply, DeAcosta said he hopes to continue partnering with Esterbrook Pharmacy and providing these clinics to the community.

 ?? SHEA SINGLEY — READING EAGLE ?? The Highlands of Wyomissing resident James Barrett directs a COVID-19vaccine clinic attendee to one of the open seats in the observatio­n area during the two-day clinic Monday.
SHEA SINGLEY — READING EAGLE The Highlands of Wyomissing resident James Barrett directs a COVID-19vaccine clinic attendee to one of the open seats in the observatio­n area during the two-day clinic Monday.

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