Dur­ing his two decades in Congress, it is fair to say that Boehner did not work his way up Repub­li­can ranks by po­si­tion­ing him­self as a cru­sader for the poor and down­trod­den.

Dayton Daily News - - OPINION -

with a sin­gle bath­room in south­west­ern Ohio. He can’t even visit schools any­more, he said, with­out blub­ber­ing at the mere sight of lit­tle kids run­ning around.

“Mak­ing sure that these kids have a shot at the Amer­i­can Dream, like I did,” he said, once again chok­ing back tears. “It’s im­por­tant.”

Yes, it is. But for the man who is about to be two heart­beats away from the pres­i­dency, I of­ten won­der, how im­por­tant is it? How big of “a shot” does he think those kids de­serve? What does he think the govern­ment can do to help or, at least, re­move bar­ri­ers from their paths to suc­cess?

Dur­ing his two decades in Congress, it is fair to say that Boehner did not work his way up Repub­li­can ranks by po­si­tion­ing him­self as a cru­sader for the poor and down­trod­den. He’s bet­ter known as a friend of busi­nesses, big and Clarence Page writes for the Chicago Tribune. E-mail ad­dress: cpage@tribune.com.

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