Dayton Daily News

Guide to Vietnam summit with Trump, Kim Jong Un

Leaders will meet in hopes to achieve denucleari­zation.

- Russell Goldman

President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un, the reclusive leader of North Korea, will attempt to iron out the details of a history-making agreement on denucleari­zation when the pair meet later this month in Hanoi, Vietnam, for their second face-to-face dialogue.

The leaders make for strange diplomatic bedfellows: Neither man has a reputation for making friends out of foes, and each has publicly mocked the other.

But in the eight months since their first meeting in Singapore there have been notable changes on the Korean Peninsula, including the repatriati­on of American soldiers’ remains, a cessation in North Korean missile and nuclear tests and a decrease in American-led war games.

Trump and Kim agreed at their previous meeting to the “complete denucleari­zation” of the peninsula. But since then, the two sides have been unable to agree on what that phrase actually means, leading to a stalemate and a breakdown in talks.

Here’s what to expect at the upcoming summit.

Who is negotiatin­g?

The North Korean diplomats and officials likely to attend the meeting are some of the country’s most experience­d negotiator­s, who have deftly wrangled with several American administra­tions. Among those expected are Ri Yong Ho, a seasoned diplomat who represente­d North Korea for years during the “six-party talks” in the 2000s and is now the country’s foreign minister; and Kim Yong Chol, a former spymaster and one of Kim Jong Un’s closest advisers.

What is discussed?

At the Singapore talks last June, Kim and Trump agreed to a four-point plan. The bullet points — each no more than a sentence — included establishi­ng relations between their countries; building a “lasting and stable peace regime”; working “toward complete denucleari­zation of the Korean Peninsula”; and repatriati­ng the remains of Americans killed during the Korean War.

Left undecided were the order in which those points were to be executed and the definition­s of terms like “peace regime” and “complete denucleari­zation.” After the meeting in Singapore, Trump declared the question of denucleari­zation “largely solved,” but the two sides have since been at loggerhead­s.

How will deal occur?

The United States and North Korea have previously come to agreements on denucleari­zation and the lifting of sanctions, only to see the deals fall apart at the last minute or be chipped away by distrust over time.

Previous American presidents have tried a mix of carrots (aid and engagement) and sticks (punishing sanctions) to persuade the North to discontinu­e its weapons program.

North Korea has traditiona­lly viewed denucleari­zation as taking place in sequenced “phases” for which it demands “simultaneo­us” incentives from Washington for each step.

Under the Singapore agreement, North Korea must work “toward” denucleari­zation while Washington is obliged to improve ties and remove hostilitie­s on the divided Korean Peninsula.

 ?? DOUG MILLS / THE NEW YORK TIMES ?? President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un of North Korea met in Singapore, June 12, 2018. Trump will get together with Kim this month in Hanoi, Vietnam, for a second summit to eliminate a potential nuclear threat.
DOUG MILLS / THE NEW YORK TIMES President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un of North Korea met in Singapore, June 12, 2018. Trump will get together with Kim this month in Hanoi, Vietnam, for a second summit to eliminate a potential nuclear threat.

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