Diesel World

DRAG RAC­ING 101

A BEGIN­NER’S GUIDE TO COL­LECT­ING THE QUICK­EST TIME SLIP POS­SI­BLE

- Sports · Lifestyle · The Simpsons

As win­ter draws to a close and you brace your­self for spring and bet­ter driv­ing weather, there is a lot to look for­ward to. For many, warmer temps mean they’ll be hit­ting the drag strip. Whether it’s to fol­low the rac­ing or­ga­ni­za­tion they run points in (such as ODSS), to find out if the changes they per­formed over the win­ter yield quicker elapsed times, or they’re just look­ing to mix things up at the lo­cal test ‘n tune, drag rac­ing is on their minds. This could be you. Trust us, there is a track in your area and an event on the cal­en­dar that’s in­tended for you and your diesel. For a lot of you it’ll be the first time you’ve ever pulled into the stag­ing lanes—and that’s OK.

If any sport is to grow, there has to be new­com­ers will­ing to give it a shot.

Like any form of com­pe­ti­tion, there are a thou­sand things to learn in or­der to be com­pet­i­tive. From race prep to stag­ing to the ac­tual race it­self to col­lect­ing your time slip and an­a­lyz­ing the data, drag rac­ing is much more than sim­ply lin­ing up and mat­ting the go pedal. For the A to Z ba­sics, we’ve got you cov­ered this month. Next month, we want to see you in the stag­ing lanes. Fol­low the tips and tricks listed here and you’ll be able to hit the ground run­ning when you de­cide to be­come more than a spec­ta­tor.

 ??  ?? Un­less you plan to bolt slicks on the rear of a four-wheel drive diesel, al­ways drag race in 4-Hi. If you’re mak­ing any sig­nif­i­cant amount of horse­power (and espe­cially torque) over stock, you won’t be able to leave the line with any amount of mean­ing­ful boost on tap with­out light­ing up the rear tires. Once that hap­pens, the race is over. By rac­ing in 4-Hi, your E.T. will be re­duced by half a se­cond or more.
Un­less you plan to bolt slicks on the rear of a four-wheel drive diesel, al­ways drag race in 4-Hi. If you’re mak­ing any sig­nif­i­cant amount of horse­power (and espe­cially torque) over stock, you won’t be able to leave the line with any amount of mean­ing­ful boost on tap with­out light­ing up the rear tires. Once that hap­pens, the race is over. By rac­ing in 4-Hi, your E.T. will be re­duced by half a se­cond or more.
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 ??  ?? Send­ing your truck down the drag strip at full bore with the kill tune up­loaded is likely the hard­est few sec­onds your en­gine will ever see. Un­der these cir­cum­stances, the chances of ex­pe­ri­enc­ing a blown in­ter­cooler boot in­crease. As part of your pre-trip in­spec­tion, do your­self a fa­vor and snug up each clamp in your in­ter­cooler pip­ing or at least ver­ify that all of them are tight. Cooler weather in par­tic­u­lar has a way of mak­ing clamps slightly con­tract, which in­creases the po­ten­tial of a blown boot sce­nario.
Send­ing your truck down the drag strip at full bore with the kill tune up­loaded is likely the hard­est few sec­onds your en­gine will ever see. Un­der these cir­cum­stances, the chances of ex­pe­ri­enc­ing a blown in­ter­cooler boot in­crease. As part of your pre-trip in­spec­tion, do your­self a fa­vor and snug up each clamp in your in­ter­cooler pip­ing or at least ver­ify that all of them are tight. Cooler weather in par­tic­u­lar has a way of mak­ing clamps slightly con­tract, which in­creases the po­ten­tial of a blown boot sce­nario.
 ??  ?? Idrag rac­ing with an au­to­matic trans­mis­sion seems sim­ple on the sur­face, but there is a lot more to it than sim­ply se­lect­ing Drive and inch­ing for­ward. To get the quick­est pos­si­ble elapsed time, you may have to ad­just or man­u­ally con­trol con­verter lock up. The sooner you lock the con­verter, the sooner you can max­i­mize the amount of power you’re send­ing to the ground. In ap­pli­ca­tions such as the Allison, a se­cond gear launch may be highly ben­e­fi­cial. Stag­ing and leav­ing in se­cond gear places more load on the en­gine, which means you can leave the line with more boost while also skip­ping the 1-2 shift de­lay that oc­curs al­most im­me­di­ately.
Idrag rac­ing with an au­to­matic trans­mis­sion seems sim­ple on the sur­face, but there is a lot more to it than sim­ply se­lect­ing Drive and inch­ing for­ward. To get the quick­est pos­si­ble elapsed time, you may have to ad­just or man­u­ally con­trol con­verter lock up. The sooner you lock the con­verter, the sooner you can max­i­mize the amount of power you’re send­ing to the ground. In ap­pli­ca­tions such as the Allison, a se­cond gear launch may be highly ben­e­fi­cial. Stag­ing and leav­ing in se­cond gear places more load on the en­gine, which means you can leave the line with more boost while also skip­ping the 1-2 shift de­lay that oc­curs al­most im­me­di­ately.
 ??  ?? If you’ve got four-wheel drive, use it. A 4x4 diesel truck has the unique ad­van­tage of be­ing able to dis­trib­ute all of its power to four sep­a­rate wheels rather than two out back. This means trac­tion is guar­an­teed even if you’re leav­ing the line with con­sid­er­able boost, and it’s why so many street trucks can cut 1.8 to 1.6-se­cond 60-foot times. Note that if you’re us­ing four-wheel drive, avoid the wa­ter in the burnout box and go straight into stag­ing your truck.
If you’ve got four-wheel drive, use it. A 4x4 diesel truck has the unique ad­van­tage of be­ing able to dis­trib­ute all of its power to four sep­a­rate wheels rather than two out back. This means trac­tion is guar­an­teed even if you’re leav­ing the line with con­sid­er­able boost, and it’s why so many street trucks can cut 1.8 to 1.6-se­cond 60-foot times. Note that if you’re us­ing four-wheel drive, avoid the wa­ter in the burnout box and go straight into stag­ing your truck.
 ??  ?? Whether you’re mak­ing 500 hp or 800 hp, it al­ways pays to drop the air pres­sure in your tires. Drop­ping air pres­sure in­creases your foot­print, and more rub­ber com­ing in con­tact with the rac­ing sur­face means more grip. Added trac­tion means bet­ter 60-foots and ET’S with no ill-ef­fect on trap speed or any other fac­tor. Just don’t drop pres­sure too low (draw the line around 20-25 psi), and make sure you have a means to air back up once you’re done rac­ing.
Whether you’re mak­ing 500 hp or 800 hp, it al­ways pays to drop the air pres­sure in your tires. Drop­ping air pres­sure in­creases your foot­print, and more rub­ber com­ing in con­tact with the rac­ing sur­face means more grip. Added trac­tion means bet­ter 60-foots and ET’S with no ill-ef­fect on trap speed or any other fac­tor. Just don’t drop pres­sure too low (draw the line around 20-25 psi), and make sure you have a means to air back up once you’re done rac­ing.
 ??  ?? It’s im­por­tant to keep in mind that the method you use to stage has a di­rect ef­fect on your re­ac­tion time. When you shal­low stage, your re­ac­tion time will be slower but your elapsed time quicker. How­ever, when you deep stage you typ­i­cally see a quicker re­ac­tion time but a slightly slower E.T. No mat­ter what, don’t get too caught up in re­ac­tion time fig­ures, as they have no bear­ing on E.T. One area where shal­low stag­ing re­ally shines for am­a­teur drag rac­ers is if they’ve been leav­ing too early (i.e. red-light­ing).
It’s im­por­tant to keep in mind that the method you use to stage has a di­rect ef­fect on your re­ac­tion time. When you shal­low stage, your re­ac­tion time will be slower but your elapsed time quicker. How­ever, when you deep stage you typ­i­cally see a quicker re­ac­tion time but a slightly slower E.T. No mat­ter what, don’t get too caught up in re­ac­tion time fig­ures, as they have no bear­ing on E.T. One area where shal­low stag­ing re­ally shines for am­a­teur drag rac­ers is if they’ve been leav­ing too early (i.e. red-light­ing).
 ??  ?? As­sum­ing you’ve al­ready locked the trans­fer case in 4-Hi (where ap­pli­ca­ble) and driven past or around the burnout box, be­gin creep­ing up to the start­ing line. You’ll want to do this slowly so as not to trip both the pre-staged and staged beams too quickly. Be­fore trip­ping the first beam, start build­ing boost by power brak­ing the truck (brake pedal to the floor, mod­er­ate throt­tle ap­plied). Work­ing the brake and throt­tle, slowly inch your way into the se­cond beam. Once the staged bulb is lit, the afore­men­tioned three yel­low lights will be­gin il­lu­mi­nat­ing down­ward to­ward green in half-se­cond in­ter­vals. Leave on the last yel­low. Don’t wait un­til you see green to be­gin mov­ing.
As­sum­ing you’ve al­ready locked the trans­fer case in 4-Hi (where ap­pli­ca­ble) and driven past or around the burnout box, be­gin creep­ing up to the start­ing line. You’ll want to do this slowly so as not to trip both the pre-staged and staged beams too quickly. Be­fore trip­ping the first beam, start build­ing boost by power brak­ing the truck (brake pedal to the floor, mod­er­ate throt­tle ap­plied). Work­ing the brake and throt­tle, slowly inch your way into the se­cond beam. Once the staged bulb is lit, the afore­men­tioned three yel­low lights will be­gin il­lu­mi­nat­ing down­ward to­ward green in half-se­cond in­ter­vals. Leave on the last yel­low. Don’t wait un­til you see green to be­gin mov­ing.
 ??  ?? Stag­ing is the most im­por­tant part of drag rac­ing, so it’s ab­so­lutely vi­tal to know ex­actly how the Christ­mas tree works. For new­com­ers, it’s best to stick with a Sports­man tree (also known as a “full” tree or .500 tree). This is the de­fault style tree that’s run at most test ‘n tunes and en­try level type bracket rac­ing classes. On a full tree, each of the three lights above green il­lu­mi­nate for ex­actly a half-se­cond at a time (hence “.500“).
Stag­ing is the most im­por­tant part of drag rac­ing, so it’s ab­so­lutely vi­tal to know ex­actly how the Christ­mas tree works. For new­com­ers, it’s best to stick with a Sports­man tree (also known as a “full” tree or .500 tree). This is the de­fault style tree that’s run at most test ‘n tunes and en­try level type bracket rac­ing classes. On a full tree, each of the three lights above green il­lu­mi­nate for ex­actly a half-se­cond at a time (hence “.500“).
 ??  ?? If you’re look­ing to get the best E.T. pos­si­ble (say you’ve been 13.00 in the quar­ter and you want to try to squeak into the 12’s), shal­low stag­ing is the best way to do it, and luck­ily this is the most com­mon form of stag­ing on a Sports­man tree. When you shal­low stage, you trip the “pre-staged” beam (il­lu­mi­nat­ing the top-most am­ber) and stop as soon as you trip the se­cond, “staged” beam (the se­cond light from the top of the tree). By slowly inch­ing into the se­cond beam and barely light­ing that se­cond light, you give your­self pre­cious ex­tra inches (7 or 8) of travel be­fore the E.T. timer be­gins. In a way, shal­low stag­ing of­fers you a head-start. This rolling head-start can be fairly sig­nif­i­cant if you’re run­ning large tires.
If you’re look­ing to get the best E.T. pos­si­ble (say you’ve been 13.00 in the quar­ter and you want to try to squeak into the 12’s), shal­low stag­ing is the best way to do it, and luck­ily this is the most com­mon form of stag­ing on a Sports­man tree. When you shal­low stage, you trip the “pre-staged” beam (il­lu­mi­nat­ing the top-most am­ber) and stop as soon as you trip the se­cond, “staged” beam (the se­cond light from the top of the tree). By slowly inch­ing into the se­cond beam and barely light­ing that se­cond light, you give your­self pre­cious ex­tra inches (7 or 8) of travel be­fore the E.T. timer be­gins. In a way, shal­low stag­ing of­fers you a head-start. This rolling head-start can be fairly sig­nif­i­cant if you’re run­ning large tires.
 ??  ?? The in­spec­tions don’t end at home. As you ar­rive at the rac­ing venue, ex­pect to wait in line for a tech in­spec­tion to be con­ducted by one of the track’s of­fi­cials. Of­ten noth­ing more than a quick once-over to make sure your ve­hi­cle is safe to send down the track, the in­spec­tion can en­tail a vis­ual check for fluid leaks, nails in tires, cracks in the wind­shield, and con­fir­ma­tion that the bat­ter­ies are prop­erly se­cured. And just as you had to sign a waiver to race, you’ll likely have to fill out a tech card and jot down your John Han­cock once more be­fore they break out the shoe pol­ish and as­sign you a num­ber.
The in­spec­tions don’t end at home. As you ar­rive at the rac­ing venue, ex­pect to wait in line for a tech in­spec­tion to be con­ducted by one of the track’s of­fi­cials. Of­ten noth­ing more than a quick once-over to make sure your ve­hi­cle is safe to send down the track, the in­spec­tion can en­tail a vis­ual check for fluid leaks, nails in tires, cracks in the wind­shield, and con­fir­ma­tion that the bat­ter­ies are prop­erly se­cured. And just as you had to sign a waiver to race, you’ll likely have to fill out a tech card and jot down your John Han­cock once more be­fore they break out the shoe pol­ish and as­sign you a num­ber.
 ??  ?? It’s true that drop­ping weight is the same as adding horse­power. Think about it, if you re­duce the amount of mass you need to get mov­ing (and keep mov­ing) you can lower your elapsed time—and you can do it for free! Sim­ple things like re­mov­ing the spare tire, los­ing the tail­gate, pulling the drop-in bed liner, leav­ing all of your tools be­hind, and even show­ing up on a quar­ter tank of fuel all play into your fa­vor.
It’s true that drop­ping weight is the same as adding horse­power. Think about it, if you re­duce the amount of mass you need to get mov­ing (and keep mov­ing) you can lower your elapsed time—and you can do it for free! Sim­ple things like re­mov­ing the spare tire, los­ing the tail­gate, pulling the drop-in bed liner, leav­ing all of your tools be­hind, and even show­ing up on a quar­ter tank of fuel all play into your fa­vor.
 ??  ?? How quick you can get staged or how well you can build boost on the line for an ef­fec­tive launch is de­pen­dent on a lot of things. The size of your tur­bocharger(s), what horse­power level you’re at, and the stall speed of your torque con­verter are just a few of the vari­ables that play into it. For ex­am­ple, a looser (higher stall speed) con­verter will al­low you to build more boost than one with a tighter stall speed. So if you’ve added a bunch of fuel and a big sin­gle turbo but are still run­ning a stock stall speed con­verter, you likely won’t be able to get off the line as quickly as you could with a higher stall.
How quick you can get staged or how well you can build boost on the line for an ef­fec­tive launch is de­pen­dent on a lot of things. The size of your tur­bocharger(s), what horse­power level you’re at, and the stall speed of your torque con­verter are just a few of the vari­ables that play into it. For ex­am­ple, a looser (higher stall speed) con­verter will al­low you to build more boost than one with a tighter stall speed. So if you’ve added a bunch of fuel and a big sin­gle turbo but are still run­ning a stock stall speed con­verter, you likely won’t be able to get off the line as quickly as you could with a higher stall.
 ??  ?? Even though the weather can be warm at the height of the drag rac­ing sea­son, leave the shorts and san­dals at home and wear closed toe shoes and pants when it’s time to climb into the driver seat. This tip is com­mon sense 101, but you’d be sur­prised how many peo­ple show up ex­pect­ing to race in flip-flops.
Even though the weather can be warm at the height of the drag rac­ing sea­son, leave the shorts and san­dals at home and wear closed toe shoes and pants when it’s time to climb into the driver seat. This tip is com­mon sense 101, but you’d be sur­prised how many peo­ple show up ex­pect­ing to race in flip-flops.
 ??  ?? If your truck is ca­pa­ble of run­ning 13.99 or faster in the quar­ter-mile, NHRA guide­lines re­quire you to wear a hel­met. Hel­mets should have a SNELL rat­ing of 2010 or 2015 (2010 hel­mets ex­pire on Jan­uary 1, 2022). If your truck runs faster than 11.50 in the quar­ter-mile, you’re prob­a­bly not new to drag rac­ing, and at this point you know you need a roll bar to legally go down the track.
If your truck is ca­pa­ble of run­ning 13.99 or faster in the quar­ter-mile, NHRA guide­lines re­quire you to wear a hel­met. Hel­mets should have a SNELL rat­ing of 2010 or 2015 (2010 hel­mets ex­pire on Jan­uary 1, 2022). If your truck runs faster than 11.50 in the quar­ter-mile, you’re prob­a­bly not new to drag rac­ing, and at this point you know you need a roll bar to legally go down the track.
 ??  ?? While cour­tesy stag­ing (as it’s for­mally known) isn’t al­ways en­forced, it’s al­ways a good idea to prac­tice it no mat­ter what. Cour­tesy stag­ing means com­peti­tors take turns trip­ping the pre-staged and staged beams. For ex­am­ple: you light your pre-stage, then wait for your op­po­nent to light both the pre-staged and staged beams be­fore you light your staged beam. This way, nei­ther of you is rushed into stag­ing. It’s the fairest way to play.
While cour­tesy stag­ing (as it’s for­mally known) isn’t al­ways en­forced, it’s al­ways a good idea to prac­tice it no mat­ter what. Cour­tesy stag­ing means com­peti­tors take turns trip­ping the pre-staged and staged beams. For ex­am­ple: you light your pre-stage, then wait for your op­po­nent to light both the pre-staged and staged beams be­fore you light your staged beam. This way, nei­ther of you is rushed into stag­ing. It’s the fairest way to play.
 ??  ?? Leave your A/C off. Given the fact that most novices are rac­ing their daily driv­ers or work trucks, this can be easy to for­get to do, but adding mois­ture to the track is a big no-no. Also re­mem­ber to roll up your win­dows when it’s your turn to stage.
Leave your A/C off. Given the fact that most novices are rac­ing their daily driv­ers or work trucks, this can be easy to for­get to do, but adding mois­ture to the track is a big no-no. Also re­mem­ber to roll up your win­dows when it’s your turn to stage.
 ??  ?? Our last bit of ad­vice is to re­frain from hot-lap­ping your truck. Give things a break be­tween passes and a chance for the en­gine and trans­mis­sion to cool down. Even though your trans­mis­sion temp gauge may not have got­ten hot on the first pass, the torque con­verter still could’ve seen ex­ces­sive heat, even if only tem­po­rar­ily. Even if you’re not mak­ing a ton of power, hot-lap­ping can take a lot of miles off of your equip­ment.
Our last bit of ad­vice is to re­frain from hot-lap­ping your truck. Give things a break be­tween passes and a chance for the en­gine and trans­mis­sion to cool down. Even though your trans­mis­sion temp gauge may not have got­ten hot on the first pass, the torque con­verter still could’ve seen ex­ces­sive heat, even if only tem­po­rar­ily. Even if you’re not mak­ing a ton of power, hot-lap­ping can take a lot of miles off of your equip­ment.
 ??  ?? If you’re lim­ited to your lo­cal, eighth-mile track but want to make an ed­u­cated guess as to what your truck would run in the quar­ter, a con­ver­sion fac­tor of 1.57 to 1.59 will get you real close. Sim­ply take your eighth-mile elapsed time and mul­ti­ply it by the afore­men­tioned num­bers (ex: an 8.00 eighth-mile equates to a quar­ter-mile E.T. be­tween 12.56 to 12.72 sec­onds). If you’re es­ti­mat­ing your quar­ter-mile trap speed, mul­ti­ply your eighth-mile mph num­ber by 1.25. These con­ver­sion fac­tors hold true for most street-driven trucks.
If you’re lim­ited to your lo­cal, eighth-mile track but want to make an ed­u­cated guess as to what your truck would run in the quar­ter, a con­ver­sion fac­tor of 1.57 to 1.59 will get you real close. Sim­ply take your eighth-mile elapsed time and mul­ti­ply it by the afore­men­tioned num­bers (ex: an 8.00 eighth-mile equates to a quar­ter-mile E.T. be­tween 12.56 to 12.72 sec­onds). If you’re es­ti­mat­ing your quar­ter-mile trap speed, mul­ti­ply your eighth-mile mph num­ber by 1.25. These con­ver­sion fac­tors hold true for most street-driven trucks.
 ??  ?? Dynos are fun, but noth­ing is a bet­ter in­di­ca­tor of horse­power than the drag strip. As long as you know the weight of your truck on race day, you can cal­cu­late how much power it’s send­ing to the wheels us­ing the elapsed time and trap speed listed on your time slip. Ac­cu­rate on­line horse­power cal­cu­la­tors can be found at Wal­lac­erac­ing.com or Com­pe­ti­tiondiesel.com. While both ET and mph can get you a very close ball­park hp num­ber, us­ing trap speed is al­ways the more ac­cu­rate of the two.
Dynos are fun, but noth­ing is a bet­ter in­di­ca­tor of horse­power than the drag strip. As long as you know the weight of your truck on race day, you can cal­cu­late how much power it’s send­ing to the wheels us­ing the elapsed time and trap speed listed on your time slip. Ac­cu­rate on­line horse­power cal­cu­la­tors can be found at Wal­lac­erac­ing.com or Com­pe­ti­tiondiesel.com. While both ET and mph can get you a very close ball­park hp num­ber, us­ing trap speed is al­ways the more ac­cu­rate of the two.
 ??  ?? Diesel-only events are fun, but don’t for­get that any old test ‘n tune at your lo­cal, small-town drag strip of­fers a great chance to hone your drag rac­ing skills. Plus, it’s an ex­cit­ing way to mix things up with late-model sports cars, clas­sic mus­cle cars, and plenty of sleepers.
Diesel-only events are fun, but don’t for­get that any old test ‘n tune at your lo­cal, small-town drag strip of­fers a great chance to hone your drag rac­ing skills. Plus, it’s an ex­cit­ing way to mix things up with late-model sports cars, clas­sic mus­cle cars, and plenty of sleepers.
 ??  ?? When­ever pos­si­ble, data log your passes. Not for­get­ting to grab your time slip is one thing, but know­ing how your en­gine per­formed through­out the du­ra­tion of the run can be ex­tremely ben­e­fi­cial in point­ing out a prob­lem, di­ag­nos­ing that prob­lem, or sim­ply ver­i­fy­ing that ev­ery­thing is work­ing as it should. For in­stance, see­ing what rail pres­sure you were able to sus­tain, what fuel pres­sure fell to, or how high your EGT was can be ex­tremely telling.
When­ever pos­si­ble, data log your passes. Not for­get­ting to grab your time slip is one thing, but know­ing how your en­gine per­formed through­out the du­ra­tion of the run can be ex­tremely ben­e­fi­cial in point­ing out a prob­lem, di­ag­nos­ing that prob­lem, or sim­ply ver­i­fy­ing that ev­ery­thing is work­ing as it should. For in­stance, see­ing what rail pres­sure you were able to sus­tain, what fuel pres­sure fell to, or how high your EGT was can be ex­tremely telling.
 ??  ?? Test ‘n tune events of­fer plenty of prac­tice for a novice drag racer, espe­cially on nights when turnout is low. With fewer com­peti­tors, you can get a lot more passes in, mak­ing ad­just­ments to your driv­ing style or the truck in be­tween, and be­com­ing more com­fort­able each time down the track.
Test ‘n tune events of­fer plenty of prac­tice for a novice drag racer, espe­cially on nights when turnout is low. With fewer com­peti­tors, you can get a lot more passes in, mak­ing ad­just­ments to your driv­ing style or the truck in be­tween, and be­com­ing more com­fort­able each time down the track.
 ??  ?? While un­for­tu­nate, leaks, driv­e­line break­age and out­right oil-downs do hap­pen from time to time, and when they oc­cur all ac­tion on the track comes to a stop. If you sus­pect any­thing is dras­ti­cally wrong dur­ing your own jour­ney down the track, our best ad­vice is to pull over to the side of the track im­me­di­ately. By pulling over as soon as pos­si­ble, you min­i­mize the dam­age done to the rac­ing sur­face and less clean-up will be nec­es­sary to get rac­ing back underway.
While un­for­tu­nate, leaks, driv­e­line break­age and out­right oil-downs do hap­pen from time to time, and when they oc­cur all ac­tion on the track comes to a stop. If you sus­pect any­thing is dras­ti­cally wrong dur­ing your own jour­ney down the track, our best ad­vice is to pull over to the side of the track im­me­di­ately. By pulling over as soon as pos­si­ble, you min­i­mize the dam­age done to the rac­ing sur­face and less clean-up will be nec­es­sary to get rac­ing back underway.
 ??  ?? So you’ve built ad­e­quate boost in your stag­ing, cut a good light, and rock­eted out of the hole and down the track as quickly as pos­si­ble— now it’s time to col­lect your re­port card. The time slip you col­lect on the re­turn road lead­ing back to the pits has all the data you need to an­a­lyze you and your truck’s per­for­mance. The phys­i­cal act of drag rac­ing is be­yond ex­cit­ing, but this in­for­ma­tion will tell you where you need to im­prove, what went wrong, or if your truck is ac­tu­ally mak­ing the same horse­power that fancy dyno said you were…
So you’ve built ad­e­quate boost in your stag­ing, cut a good light, and rock­eted out of the hole and down the track as quickly as pos­si­ble— now it’s time to col­lect your re­port card. The time slip you col­lect on the re­turn road lead­ing back to the pits has all the data you need to an­a­lyze you and your truck’s per­for­mance. The phys­i­cal act of drag rac­ing is be­yond ex­cit­ing, but this in­for­ma­tion will tell you where you need to im­prove, what went wrong, or if your truck is ac­tu­ally mak­ing the same horse­power that fancy dyno said you were…

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